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Journal of Happiness Studies

, Volume 16, Issue 5, pp 1149–1162 | Cite as

Mindfulness, Basic Psychological Needs Fulfillment, and Well-Being

  • Jen-Ho ChangEmail author
  • Chin-Lan Huang
  • Yi-Cheng Lin
Research Paper

Abstract

The positive relationship between mindfulness and well-being has been demonstrated to a great extent in prior studies; however, the underlying psychological mechanism relating mindfulness to well-being is not fully understood. Based on self-determination theory (Deci and Ryan in Psychol Inq 11:227–268, 2000), this article proposed the basic psychological needs fulfillment (i.e., autonomy, relatedness, and competence) as the key mechanisms that account for the relationship between mindfulness and well-being. The results of our two studies revealed that mindfulness, basic psychological needs fulfillment, hedonic (Study 1) and eudaimonic well-being (Study 2) are correlated with each other. In addition, the positive relationships between mindfulness and both hedonic (Study 1) and eudaimonic well-being (Study 2) can be mediated via basic psychological needs fulfillment. The implications of these findings are discussed.

Keywords

Mindfulness Basic psychological needs fulfillment Hedonic well-being Eudaimonic well-being Self-determination theory 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Educational Psychology and CounselingNational Taiwan Normal UniversityTaipeiTaiwan
  2. 2.Department of Humanities and Social ScienceNational Taiwan University of Science and TechnologyTaipei CityTaiwan
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyNational Taiwan UniversityTaipeiTaiwan

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