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Journal of Happiness Studies

, Volume 15, Issue 4, pp 957–977 | Cite as

Optimising Employee Mental Health: The Relationship Between Intrinsic Need Satisfaction, Job Crafting, and Employee Well-Being

  • Gavin R. Slemp
  • Dianne A. Vella-BrodrickEmail author
Research Paper

Abstract

Organisations are frequently confronted with the issue of how to enhance employee mental health. Based on self-determination theory, a model is proposed that examines the relationships between job crafting, the satisfaction of the intrinsic needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness at work, and employee well-being—defined here as both subjective well-being and psychological well-being. A sample of 253 working adults completed a battery of questionnaires including the Job Crafting Questionnaire, the Intrinsic Need Satisfaction Scale, and the Mental Health Continuum. Using structural equation modelling methods, it was determined that job crafting predicted intrinsic need satisfaction, which, in turn, predicted employee well-being. The results suggest that job crafting may be an important underpinning upon which to base an employee well-being intervention.

Keywords

Job crafting Well-being Self-determination theory Autonomy Competence Relatedness Need satisfaction 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank Dr Simon Albrecht and Dr Simon Moss of Monash University, who offered valuable statistical insight and advice that greatly assisted the research.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Psychology and PsychiatryMonash UniversityVictoriaAustralia
  2. 2.Melbourne Graduate School of EducationUniversity of MelbourneVictoriaAustralia

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