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Relations Among Mindfulness, Achievement-Related Self-Regulation, and Achievement Emotions

Abstract

Mindfulness has been hypothesized to directly facilitate well-being, and to indirectly do so by enhancing self-regulated functioning. No prior research has examined these relationships in the domain of academic achievement. The current study tested relationships among mindfulness, achievement-related self-regulation (e.g., delay-of-gratification, help-seeking, and self-control) and achievement emotions among a sample of 290 undergraduate students. Results revealed that indices of mindfulness, achievement-related self-regulation, and achievement emotions were significantly inter-correlated. And, results supported the hypothesis that the prediction of achievement emotions by mindfulness was mediated by greater self-regulation over achievement. Results are considered in light of recent evidence for associations among mindfulness, self-regulation, and well-being in other domains of functioning; with respect to theoretical and practical implications; and with respect to the possible fruitfulness of research bridging self-regulation as a character strength and achievement-related functioning.

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Correspondence to Andrew J. Howell.

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Howell, A.J., Buro, K. Relations Among Mindfulness, Achievement-Related Self-Regulation, and Achievement Emotions. J Happiness Stud 12, 1007–1022 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10902-010-9241-7

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Keywords

  • Mindfulness
  • Achievement
  • Self-regulation
  • Emotions
  • Well-being