Friendship, Need Satisfaction and Happiness

Abstract

Friendship quality is an important predictor of happiness, however, what might account for the association between the two? Two studies investigated satisfaction of basic psychological needs as a mediator of the relationship between friendship quality and happiness. Study 1 (n = 424) found support for the model for best friendship. Second study (n = 176) replicated the first study and showed that needs satisfaction in best and two closest friendships mediated the relationship between the quality of all friendships and happiness. The findings suggest that one reason why the quality of friendships is related to happiness is because friendship experiences provide a context where basic needs are satisfied.

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Correspondence to Melikşah Demir.

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Demir, M., Özdemir, M. Friendship, Need Satisfaction and Happiness. J Happiness Stud 11, 243–259 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10902-009-9138-5

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Keywords

  • Friendship quality
  • Happiness
  • Need satisfaction
  • Self-determination theory
  • Mediation
  • Structural equation modeling