Sweetheart, you really make me happy: romantic relationship quality and personality as predictors of happiness among emerging adults

Abstract

Two studies investigated the predictive ability of romantic relationship quality in happiness above and beyond the influence of personality (Big Five) among emerging adults. Study 1 (n = 221) showed that global romantic relationship quality accounted for 3% of the variance in happiness while controlling for personality. Study 2 (n = 187) replicated this finding by assessing happiness and relationship quality with different scales. Second study also extended the first study in two ways. First, emotional security and companionship emerged as the strongest features of romantic relationship quality that predicted happiness. Second, identity formation moderated the relationship between relationship quality and happiness such that emerging adults were happier when they experienced high quality relationships at high levels of identity formation. Findings across the two studies were discussed in the light of the literature and suggestions for future research were made.

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The author would like to thank to anonymous reviewers for their valuable comments.

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Correspondence to Melikşah Demir.

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Demir, M. Sweetheart, you really make me happy: romantic relationship quality and personality as predictors of happiness among emerging adults. J Happiness Stud 9, 257–277 (2008). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10902-007-9051-8

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Keywords

  • Companionship
  • Emotional security
  • Happiness
  • Identity formation
  • Personality
  • Romantic relationship quality