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Examining Psychosocial Correlates of a Home Smoking Ban Among Low-income Smokers: Analysis of Social Support, Unmet Social Needs, Perceived Stress, and Depressive Symptoms

Abstract

Home smoking bans reduce exposure to second-hand smoke. Understanding how psychosocial factors are related to having a home smoking ban may lead to better interventions for populations less likely to have home smoking bans, including low-income smokers. In this study, we used baseline data from 1,944 participants in a randomized trial of low-income smokers in Missouri to explore psychosocial correlates of a total home smoking ban. Using logistic regression, we examined associations between psychosocial variables (social support, unmet social needs [e.g., food, housing], perceived stress, and depressive symptoms) and a total home smoking ban. 72% of participants were female, and 58% were Black/African American; 26% reported a home smoking ban. In unadjusted and adjusted models, greater social support was associated with greater likelihood of a home smoking ban. Stress was negatively associated with a ban in adjusted models only. The fact that most participants did not have a home smoking ban highlights the need for further intervention in this population. Results suggest links between social support and having a home smoking ban, although effect sizes were small. Smoke-free home interventions that increase social connectedness or leverage existing support may be especially effective. Tobacco control planners may also consider partnering with agencies addressing social isolation.

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Availability of data and material

The datasets analyzed during the current study are available from the corresponding author on reasonable request.

Code Availability

Analytic code is provided in a manuscript supplement.

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Funding

This study was funded by the National Cancer Institute (R01CA201429; PI: Kreuter; R01CA235773; mPI: Kreuter, McQueen).

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Authors

Contributions

Tess Thompson: Conceptualization; formal analysis; methodology; writing-original draft; writing-review and editing.

Ebuwa Evbuoma-Fike: Conceptualization; formal analysis; methodology; writing-original draft; writing-review and editing.

Rachel Garg: Conceptualization; data curation; formal analysis; investigation; methodology; writing-original draft; writing-review and editing.

Amy McQueen: Conceptualization; funding acquisition; data curation; methodology; supervision; writing—review and editing.

Charlene Caburnay: Conceptualization; funding acquisition; investigation; methodology; project administration; supervision; writing-review and editing.

Matthew Kreuter: Conceptualization; funding acquisition; methodology; project administration; resources; supervision; writing-review and editing.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Tess Thompson.

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The authors have no relevant financial or non-financial interests to disclose.

Ethics approval

This study was approved by the Human Research Protection Office at Washington University in St. Louis.

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All study participants provided informed consent.

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Not applicable.

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Supplementary Material 1

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Thompson, T., Evbuoma-Fike, E.I., Garg, R. et al. Examining Psychosocial Correlates of a Home Smoking Ban Among Low-income Smokers: Analysis of Social Support, Unmet Social Needs, Perceived Stress, and Depressive Symptoms. J Community Health (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10900-022-01094-4

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10900-022-01094-4

Keywords

  • Social determinants of health
  • Social support
  • Depression
  • Secondhand smoke
  • Tobacco control