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Variations in Access to Care After the Affordable Care Act Among Different Immigrant Groups

  • Mienah Zulfacar SharifEmail author
  • Goleen Samari
  • Héctor E. Alcalá
Original Paper

Abstract

To assess how the Affordable Care Act (ACA) impacted changes in access and utilization of health care between groups by examining differences across groups of immigrants and by citizenship status. Data came from respondents of the 2011–2016 National Health Interview Survey aged 18 to 64 who were born outside of the U.S. or were native-born non-Latino whites (N = 119,198). Outcome measures included (all in the past 12 months): being currently uninsured, being insured via Medicaid, visiting the emergency department, visiting a doctor at least once, delaying care due to costs, not getting needed care because respondent was unable to afford it and being told by doctor office that they would not accept you as a new patient. The ACA was associated with greater healthcare access and utilization for some groups, but heterogeneously across all groups. For example, some immigrant groups had better access and utilization than others, and similar variation was revealed across citizenship groups. This study underscores the importance of disentangling how policies can affect immigrants from different regions of the world, which has implications for healthcare utilization and disparities.

Keywords

immigrants disparities health services health policy 

Notes

Funding

None to disclose.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

All three authors, Sharif, Samari and Alcalá, declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

This article does not contain any studies with human participants performed by any of the authors.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mienah Zulfacar Sharif
    • 1
    Email author
  • Goleen Samari
    • 2
  • Héctor E. Alcalá
    • 3
  1. 1.Center for Racism, Social Justice and HealthUniversity of California, Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Mailman School of Public HealthColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Department of Family, Population and Preventive MedicineStony Brook UniversityStony BrookUSA

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