Journal of Community Health

, Volume 40, Issue 3, pp 414–418 | Cite as

Decreasing Trend in Tobacco-Related Cancer Incidence, United States 2005–2009

  • J. Michael Underwood
  • Thomas B. Richards
  • S. Jane Henley
  • Behnoosh Momin
  • Keisha Houston
  • Italia Rolle
  • Carissa Holmes
  • Sherri L. Stewart
Original Paper

Abstract

More than 1 in 3 cancer-related deaths are associated with tobacco use; these include cancers of the lung and bronchus, oral cavity and pharynx, larynx, esophagus, stomach, pancreas, kidney and renal pelvis, urinary bladder, and cervix, and acute myeloid leukemia. In order to characterize the current cancer burden due to tobacco use, this study provides recent trends in tobacco-related cancer incidence across the US. We analyzed data from CDC’s National Program of Cancer Registries and NCI’s Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program, covering 100 % of the US population during 2005–2009. Age-adjusted incidence rates, 95 % confidence intervals and annual percent change were calculated for each state, the District of Columbia, and the US. Tobacco-related cancer incidence in the US decreased significantly from 152.9 (per 100,000 persons) in 2005 to 145.8 in 2009. Men had higher incidence rates, but a greater decrease in tobacco-related cancers per year over the 5-year time period (−1.4 % in men, compared to −0.8 % in women). Incidence rates decreased the most per year for larynx (−2.4 %), lung and bronchus (−1.9 %) and stomach (−1.5 %) cancers during the study period. Tobacco-related cancer incidence trends varied by state. While tobacco-related cancer incidence in the United States decreased overall from 2005 to 2009, tobacco continued to account for a large cancer burden. Our findings suggest that continued efforts in tobacco prevention and control are needed to further reduce tobacco-related cancer burden in general and among targeted sub-populations in the US.

Keywords

Epidemiology Cancer Neoplasm Tobacco 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York (outside the USA) 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Michael Underwood
    • 1
  • Thomas B. Richards
    • 1
  • S. Jane Henley
    • 1
  • Behnoosh Momin
    • 1
  • Keisha Houston
    • 1
  • Italia Rolle
    • 2
  • Carissa Holmes
    • 2
  • Sherri L. Stewart
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Cancer Prevention and ControlNational Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.Office on Smoking and HealthNational Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA

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