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Journal of Community Health

, Volume 36, Issue 5, pp 728–732 | Cite as

The Influence of Social Networks on Patients’ Attitudes Toward Type II Diabetes

  • Nandini ManiEmail author
  • Enrico Caiola
  • Robert J. Fortuna
Original Paper

Abstract

Social networks are increasingly recognized as important determinants of many chronic diseases, yet little data exist regarding the influence of social networks on diabetes. We surveyed diabetic patients to determine how social networks affect their overall level of concern regarding diabetes and its complications. We adapted a previously published instrument and surveyed 240 diabetic patients at two primary care practices. Patients recorded the number of family and friends who had diabetes and rated their level of concern about diabetes on a scale of 0% (no concern) to 100% (extremely concerned). Our primary outcome variable was patients’ level of concern (<75% or ≥75%). We developed logistic regression models to determine the effect of disease burden in patients’ social networks on expressed level of concern about diabetes. We received 154 surveys (64% response rate). We found that for each additional family member with diabetes, patients expressed a greater level of concern about diabetes (AOR 1.5; 95% CI 1.2–2.0) and its potential complications (AOR 1.4; 95% CI 1.1–1.7). Similarly, patients with an increased number of friends with diabetes expressed greater concern about diabetes (AOR 1.5; 95% CI 1.2–1.9) and its complications (AOR 1.3; 95% CI 1.1–1.7). Patients with a higher prevalence of diabetes within their social networks expressed greater concern about diabetes and diabetic complications. Determining disease burden within patients’ social networks may allow physicians to better understand patients’ perspectives on their disease and ultimately help them achieve meaningful behavioral change.

Keywords

Primary care Disease management Diabetes Social network Health outcomes 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research received no specific grant from any funding agency in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors. This study was approved by the University of Rochester Research Subjects Review Board RSRB00026393. For their invaluable assistance in administering surveys, the authors would like to gratefully acknowledge the physicians, nurses and support staff at Culver Medical Group and East Ridge Family Medicine. We would also like to thank Dr. Guy Montgomery and his colleagues for sharing with us the prototype for our survey instrument.

Conflict of interest

To the best of our knowledge, we have no conflicts of interest to disclose.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nandini Mani
    • 1
    Email author
  • Enrico Caiola
    • 2
  • Robert J. Fortuna
    • 2
  1. 1.Harvard Medical SchoolMassachusetts General Hospital and MGH Revere Health Care CenterRevereUSA
  2. 2.University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Center for Primary Care, Culver Medical GroupRochesterUSA

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