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Who Wants to Quit? Characteristics of American Indian Youth Who Seek Smoking Cessation Intervention

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Abstract

No group is more at-risk for tobacco-related health disparities than are American Indian youth. Little is known about their readiness to quit smoking and the extent to which cessation programs may require cultural tailoring related to recruitment, implementation, or content. This study identifies unique characteristics of American Indian teen smokers who enrolled in a school-based smoking cessation program, Not On Tobacco (called N-O-T). Using data from N-O-T intervention trials conducted in North Carolina between 2001 and 2004, the present study (a) describes the characteristics of American Indian participants (n = 91); (b) determines if basic demographics and smoking history affect intervention readiness; and (c) compares findings with non-Native participants (n = 138) enrolled in N-O-T within the same state. Upon enrollment, 80% of the sample reported that they planned to quit smoking in the next 1–6 months. We found significant differences between American Indian and non-Native youth on smoking history, with non-Natives smoking with greater intensity and frequency. Contrary to previous reports, American Indian youth in this study smoked with less intensity and were more ready to quit smoking than non-Native youth. Results reveal previously unreported characteristics of American Indian teen smokers. Study findings may advance the development of effective marketing, recruitment, and programming among American Indian teen smokers into cessation programs, particularly N-O-T, which is the only teen smoking cessation program which includes an adaptation specifically for American Indians.

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Acknowledgments

The data from this investigation resulted in part from a research project funded by the American Legacy Foundation (Grant # 5076), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (R06-CCR321438-01), and the NC Health and Wellness Trust Fund Commission.

Human Participation Protection

The study adhered to the non-discriminatory Institutional Review Board (IRB) policies and procedures of two academic institutions, tribal council permission, and formal tribal approval as required. Participants provided signed IRB-approved parental consent and participant assent forms prior to study enrollment.

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Correspondence to Kimberly Horn.

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Horn, K., Noerachmanto, N., Dino, G. et al. Who Wants to Quit? Characteristics of American Indian Youth Who Seek Smoking Cessation Intervention. J Community Health 34, 153–163 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10900-008-9131-7

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10900-008-9131-7

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