Journal of Gambling Studies

, Volume 33, Issue 3, pp 937–953 | Cite as

The Involvement of a Concerned Significant Other in Gambling Disorder Treatment Outcome

  • Susana Jiménez-Murcia
  • Joël Tremblay
  • Randy Stinchfield
  • Roser Granero
  • Fernando Fernández-Aranda
  • Gemma Mestre-Bach
  • Trevor Steward
  • Amparo del Pino-Gutiérrez
  • Marta Baño
  • Laura Moragas
  • Neus Aymamí
  • Mónica Gómez-Peña
  • Salomé Tárrega
  • Eduardo Valenciano-Mendoza
  • Isabelle Giroux
  • Marta Sancho
  • Isabel Sánchez
  • Núria Mallorquí-Bagué
  • Vega González
  • Virginia Martín-Romera
  • José M. Menchón
Original Paper

Abstract

Interpersonal distress is a common feature in gambling disorder and adding a concerned significant other (CSO) to the recovery process could be an effective tool for improving treatment outcome. However, little empirical evidence is available regarding the effectiveness of including a CSO to interventions. We aimed to compare treatment outcomes (i.e. compliance with therapy guidelines, dropout from treatment, and relapse during treatment) in a CBT program involving a CSO to CBT treatment as usual (TAU) without a CSO. The sample comprised male gambling disorder patients (N = 675). The manualized CBT intervention consisted of 16 weekly outpatient group sessions and a 3-month follow-up period. Patient CSOs attended a predetermined number of sessions with the patient and were provided with resources to acquire a better understanding of the disorder, to manage risk situations, and to aid patients in adhering to treatment guidelines. Patients with a CSO had significant higher treatment attendance and reduced dropout compared to patients receiving TAU. Moreover, patients whose spouse was involved in the treatment program were less likely to relapse and adhered to the treatment guidelines more than those with a non-spousal CSO. Our results suggest that incorporating interpersonal support to gambling disorder interventions could potentially improve treatment outcomes.

Keywords

Gambling disorder Cognitive-behavioral therapy Concerned significant others Outcome predictors 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susana Jiménez-Murcia
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Joël Tremblay
    • 4
  • Randy Stinchfield
    • 5
  • Roser Granero
    • 2
    • 6
  • Fernando Fernández-Aranda
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Gemma Mestre-Bach
    • 1
    • 2
  • Trevor Steward
    • 1
    • 2
  • Amparo del Pino-Gutiérrez
    • 1
    • 7
  • Marta Baño
    • 1
  • Laura Moragas
    • 1
  • Neus Aymamí
    • 1
  • Mónica Gómez-Peña
    • 1
  • Salomé Tárrega
    • 6
  • Eduardo Valenciano-Mendoza
    • 1
  • Isabelle Giroux
    • 8
  • Marta Sancho
    • 1
  • Isabel Sánchez
    • 1
  • Núria Mallorquí-Bagué
    • 1
    • 2
  • Vega González
    • 9
  • Virginia Martín-Romera
    • 10
  • José M. Menchón
    • 1
    • 3
    • 11
  1. 1.Pathological Gambling Unit, Department of PsychiatryBellvitge University Hospital-IDIBELLHospitalet de Llobregat, BarcelonaSpain
  2. 2.Ciber Fisiopatología Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERObn)Instituto de Salud Carlos IIIMadridSpain
  3. 3.Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of BarcelonaHospitalet de Llobregat, BarcelonaSpain
  4. 4.Département de PsychoéducationUniversité du Québec à Trois-RivièresTrois-RivièresCanada
  5. 5.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Minnesota Medical SchoolMinneapolisUSA
  6. 6.Departament de Psicobiologia i Metodologia de les Ciències de la SalutUniversitat Autònoma de BarcelonaBellaterra, BarcelonaSpain
  7. 7.Nursing Department of Mental Health, Public Health, Maternal and Child Health, Nursing SchoolUniversity of BarcelonaHospitalet del Llobregat, BarcelonaSpain
  8. 8.Centre d’Excellence pour la Prévention et le Traitement du Jeu, Faculté de Sciencies SocialesUniversité LavalQuebecCanada
  9. 9.Atención e Investigación en Socioadicciones, Red de Salud Mental y AdiccionesGeneralitat de Catalunya (XHUB)BarcelonaSpain
  10. 10.Facultat de PsicologiaUniversitat Autònoma de BarcelonaBellaterra, BarcelonaSpain
  11. 11.CIBER Salud Mental (CIBERSAM)Instituto de Salud Carlos IIIMadridSpain

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