Journal of Gambling Studies

, Volume 24, Issue 4, pp 463–477 | Cite as

Real Limits in the Virtual World: Self-Limiting Behavior of Internet Gamblers

  • Sarah E. Nelson
  • Debi A. LaPlante
  • Allyson J. Peller
  • Anja Schumann
  • Richard A. LaBrie
  • Howard J. Shaffer
Original Paper

Abstract

The recent expansion of Internet gambling has stimulated debate, policy, and research on this relatively new phenomenon and its potential consequences. The current study focuses on bettors experiencing problems by sampling Internet gamblers who imposed limits on the amount they were allowed to deposit to a betting site. We analyzed the betting transactions over 18 months of all gamblers who subscribed to an online betting site in February, 2005 (N = 47,134), 567 of whom utilized the site’s self-limit feature. Self-limiting gamblers played a wider variety of games and placed more bets than others prior to imposing limits. After imposing limits, self-limiters reduced their activity, but did not reduce the amount they wagered per bet. Time spent gambling, not just money spent, appears to be an important indicator of gambling problems. Self-limit programs appear to be promising options for Internet gamblers at-risk for gambling problems.

Keywords

Gambling Internet gambling Gambling problems Self limits Harm reduction 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sarah E. Nelson
    • 1
    • 2
  • Debi A. LaPlante
    • 1
    • 2
  • Allyson J. Peller
    • 2
  • Anja Schumann
    • 3
  • Richard A. LaBrie
    • 1
    • 2
  • Howard J. Shaffer
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  2. 2.Division on AddictionsCambridge Health AllianceMedfordUSA
  3. 3.Bremen Institute for Prevention Research and Social MedicineBremenGermany

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