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Journal of Family Violence

, Volume 25, Issue 2, pp 107–122 | Cite as

Three Patterns of Domestic Violence in Households: Single Victimization, Repeat Victimization, and Co-occurring Victimization

  • Wendi E. GoodlinEmail author
  • Christopher S. Dunn
Original Article

Abstract

Using National Crime Victimization Survey data (1992–2004), this study analyzed the effects of household variables, victim characteristics, and incident characteristics on three household family violence patterns (single victimization, repeat victimization and co-occurrence). Eighty percent of family violence households experienced one victimization; 15% experienced repeat victimization; 5% experienced co-occurrence. The total number of people in the household was positively related to multiple violent victimization households, especially co-occurrence households. Victims with less than a high school education (compared to victims with a high school education) had significantly higher odds of living in a co-occurrence household versus a repeat victimization household. Victims who experienced threatened attacks compared to completed attacks with no injury had higher odds of living in single victimization or repeat victimization households but had lower odds of living in co-occurrence households. Respondents victimized by ex-spouses, parents/stepparents, siblings, and other relatives had consistently higher odds of living in co-occurrence households versus repeat victimization households compared to those victimized by spouses.

Keywords

Family violence Co-occurrence Victim-offender relationships NCVS Repeat victimization 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors are grateful for discussions about the NCVS with, and suggestions from, James P. Lynch, Distinguished Professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, and Thomas J. Zelenock of the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data at ICPSR. Lynch teaches the annual BJS Summer Program course on Quantitative Analysis of Crime and Criminal Justice Data at ICPSR and Zelenock directs the production of NCVS public use computer files. Dunn directed the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data from 1993–2003 and Goodlin attended NCVS lectures in the 2005 summer program. In addition, the authors are grateful for the suggestions from Anthony Capon, Ph.D., Stephen Cernkovich, Ph.D., and Alfred DeMaris, Ph.D. Finally, the authors are especially appreciative for the commentary by anonymous reviewers for the Journal of Family Violence who suggested that more attention needed to be given to the issues and importance of NCVS undercounting in studying domestic violence. Any errors or omissions are the sole responsibility of the authors.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Criminal JusticeThe University of Southern MississippiHattiesburgUSA
  2. 2.College of Health and Human ServicesBowling Green State UniversityBowling GreenUSA

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