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Child labour and inequality

Abstract

This paper focuses on the role that inequality plays in shaping political support for child labour regulation policies. We provide a model of the evolution of child labour, fertility and human capital where the heterogeneity between low- and high-skilled workers allows for an endogenous analysis of inequality generated by child labour. Depending on the initial level of inequality, child labour regulation policies can affect the welfare of low- and high-skilled workers in different ways and therefore can have an impact on political support for their introduction. The possible conflicts of interest that may arise between the two groups can help explain the difficulties that many governments have when dealing with the issue of child labour.

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Correspondence to Tamara Fioroni.

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D’Alessandro, S., Fioroni, T. Child labour and inequality. J Econ Inequal 14, 63–79 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10888-015-9319-x

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10888-015-9319-x

Keywords

  • Child labour
  • Fertility
  • Human capital
  • Inequality
  • Child labour regulation