Peer-Video Modeling: Teaching Chained Social Game Behaviors to Children with ASD

  • Jennifer Kourassanis
  • Emily A. Jones
  • Daniel M. Fienup
ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Abstract

There is considerable research focusing on remediating social deficits in children with autism. Learning to engage in childhood games such as Duck Duck Goose with peers fosters a multitude of other positive social outcomes. The present study examined peer-video modeling as an intervention to teach two common childhood social games with two participants on the autism spectrum. The games involved chained gross motor behaviors that were performed in an interactive small group setting. Performance was measured by total percentage of correct responding as outlined in a task analysis of the games. Children′s performance of chained gross motor behaviors increased across both social games, suggesting peer-video modeling is an effective method in teaching chained social game behaviors.

Keywords

Autism Peer-video modeling Gross motor Chained behaviors social skills 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jennifer Kourassanis
    • 1
    • 2
  • Emily A. Jones
    • 1
    • 2
  • Daniel M. Fienup
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyQueens College (CUNY)QueensUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyThe Graduate Center (CUNY)New YorkUSA
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyQueens CollegeFlushingUSA

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