Use of a Direct Observational Measure in a Trial of Risperidone and Parent Training in Children with Pervasive Developmental Disorders

  • Benjamin L. Handen
  • Cynthia R. Johnson
  • Eric M. Butter
  • Luc Lecavalier
  • Lawrence Scahill
  • Michael G. Aman
  • Christopher J. McDougle
  • L. Eugene Arnold
  • Naomi B. Swiezy
  • Denis G. Sukhodolsky
  • James A. Mulick
  • Susan W. White
  • Karen Bearss
  • Jill A. Hollway
  • Kimberly A. Stigler
  • James Dziura
  • Sunkyung Yu
  • Kelley Sacco
  • Benedetto Vitiello
ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Abstract

A Structured Observational Analog Procedure (SOAP), an analogue measure of parent-child interactions, was used to assess treatment outcome in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and serious behavior problems. It served as a secondary outcome measure in a 24-week, randomized trial of risperidone (MED; N = 49) versus risperidone plus parent training (COMB; n = 75) (ages 4–13 years). At 24-weeks, there was 28 % reduction in child inappropriate behavior during a Demand Condition (p = .0002) and 12 % increase in compliance to parental requests (p = .004) for the two treatment conditions combined. Parents displayed 64 % greater use of positive reinforcement (p = .001) and fewer repeated requests for compliance (p < .0001). In the analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), COMB parents used significantly more positive reinforcement (p = .01) and fewer restrictive statements (p < .05) than MED parents. The SOAP is sensitive to change in child and parent behavior as a function of risperidone alone and in combination with PMT and can serve as a valuable complement to parent and clinician-based measures.

Keywords

Autism spectrum disorder Autism Observational measures Behavioral interventions Parent training Clinical trials 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benjamin L. Handen
    • 1
    • 11
  • Cynthia R. Johnson
    • 1
  • Eric M. Butter
    • 2
  • Luc Lecavalier
    • 2
  • Lawrence Scahill
    • 3
  • Michael G. Aman
    • 2
  • Christopher J. McDougle
    • 4
  • L. Eugene Arnold
    • 2
  • Naomi B. Swiezy
    • 5
  • Denis G. Sukhodolsky
    • 6
  • James A. Mulick
    • 2
  • Susan W. White
    • 7
  • Karen Bearss
    • 3
  • Jill A. Hollway
    • 2
  • Kimberly A. Stigler
    • 5
  • James Dziura
    • 3
  • Sunkyung Yu
    • 8
  • Kelley Sacco
    • 9
  • Benedetto Vitiello
    • 10
  1. 1.University of Pittsburgh School of MedicinePittsburghUSA
  2. 2.Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA
  3. 3.Emory University School of MedicineAtlantaUSA
  4. 4.Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  5. 5.Indiana University School of MedicineIndianaUSA
  6. 6.Yale UniversityNew HavenUSA
  7. 7.Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityBlacksburgUSA
  8. 8.University of Michigan Medical SchoolAnn ArborUSA
  9. 9.Children’s Hospital of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  10. 10.National Institute of Mental HealthBethesdaUSA
  11. 11.Merck ProgramWestern Psychiatry Institute and ClinicPittsburghUSA

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