Conducting Functional Communication Training via Telehealth to Reduce the Problem Behavior of Young Children with Autism

  • David P. Wacker
  • John F. Lee
  • Yaniz C. Padilla Dalmau
  • Todd G. Kopelman
  • Scott D. Lindgren
  • Jennifer Kuhle
  • Kelly E. Pelzel
  • Shannon Dyson
  • Kelly M. Schieltz
  • Debra B. Waldron
ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Abstract

Functional communication training (FCT) was conducted by parents of 17 young children with autism spectrum disorders who displayed problem behavior. All procedures were conducted at regional clinics located an average of 15 miles from the families’ homes. Parents received coaching via telehealth from behavior consultants who were located an average of 222 miles from the regional clinics. Parents first conducted functional analyses with telehealth consultation (Wacker, Lee et al. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, in press) and then conducted FCT that was matched to the identified function of problem behavior. Parent assistants located at the regional clinics received brief training in the procedures and supported the families during the clinic visits. FCT, conducted within a nonconcurrent multiple baseline design, reduced problem behavior by an average of 93.5 %. Results suggested that FCT can be conducted by parents via telehealth when experienced applied behavior analysts provide consultation.

Keywords

Functional communication training Telehealth Autism spectrum disorders Problem behavior 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • David P. Wacker
    • 1
    • 2
  • John F. Lee
    • 2
  • Yaniz C. Padilla Dalmau
    • 2
  • Todd G. Kopelman
    • 1
  • Scott D. Lindgren
    • 1
  • Jennifer Kuhle
    • 2
  • Kelly E. Pelzel
    • 2
  • Shannon Dyson
    • 2
  • Kelly M. Schieltz
    • 2
  • Debra B. Waldron
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pediatrics, The University of Iowa Carver College of MedicineThe University of Iowa Children’s HospitalIowa CityUSA
  2. 2.Center for Disabilities and DevelopmentThe University of Iowa Children’s HospitalIowa CityUSA

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