Reflections on an Anti-discriminatory Stance in Psychotherapy

Abstract

Challenges and opportunities for psychologists and psychotherapists in respect to explicit and implicit discrimination issues in therapy are explored, both from the side of the therapist and the client. Furthermore, personal reflections on such issues are discussed drawing on examples of indirect discrimination on the basis of race and sexual orientation. It is suggested that a combination of professional anti-discriminatory guidelines, a willingness to understand deeply the client’s frame of reference and self-reflection can guard against such phenomena that can harm ethical and constructive psychotherapy.

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Correspondence to Nicholas P. Sarantakis.

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Sarantakis, N.P. Reflections on an Anti-discriminatory Stance in Psychotherapy. J Contemp Psychother 47, 135–140 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10879-016-9353-4

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Keywords

  • Implicit discrimination
  • Cultural context
  • Racial discrimination
  • Sexual orientation