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Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy

, Volume 44, Issue 2, pp 117–126 | Cite as

Transforming Disorganized Attachment Through Mentalization-Based Treatment

  • Katharina MorkenEmail author
  • S. Karterud
  • N. Arefjord
Original Paper

Abstract

A disorganized attachment pattern is found among several mental disorders, most notably among severe personality disorders (PD). It is characterized by profound mentalizing deficits, which makes relations to self and others highly problematic. There is no evidence of any preferred mode of psychotherapy to heal this condition. In this article we describe the successful treatment of a female (28) with schizotypal and avoidant PD with additional borderline features as well as substance use dependency. She participated in the mentalization-based treatment project of the Bergen Clinic Foundation, Norway. We discuss the therapeutic strategies and interventions that most probably mediated the change for this patient, highlighting the mentalizing stance, working in the transference, managing countertransference and repairing alliance ruptures.

Keywords

Disorganized attachment Mentalization-based treatment Schizotypal personality disorder Substance use disorder Alliance ruptures Mechanism of change 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The Bergen Clinic FoundationBergenNorway
  2. 2.Department for Personality PsychiatryOslo University HospitalOsloNorway
  3. 3.Faculty of Medicine, Institute for Clinical MedicineUniversity of OsloOsloNorway

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