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Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy

, Volume 40, Issue 2, pp 85–93 | Cite as

Meaning Therapy: An Integrative and Positive Existential Psychotherapy

  • Paul T. P. WongEmail author
Original Paper

Abstract

Meaning Therapy, also known as meaning-centered counseling and therapy, is an integrative, positive existential approach to counseling and psychotherapy. Originated from logotherapy, Meaning Therapy employs personal meaning as its central organizing construct and assimilates various schools of psychotherapy to achieve its therapeutic goal. Meaning Therapy focuses on the positive psychology of making life worth living in spite of sufferings and limitations. It advocates a psycho-educational approach to equip clients with the tools to navigate the inevitable negatives in human existence and create a preferred future. The paper first introduces the defining characteristics and assumptions of Meaning Therapy. It then briefly describes the conceptual frameworks and the major intervention strategies. In view of Meaning Therapy’s open, flexible and integrative approach, it can be adopted either as a comprehensive method in its own right or as an adjunct to any system of psychotherapy.

Keywords

Meaning Therapy Psychotherapy process 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The Meaning Centered Counseling InstituteTorontoCanada

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