Revolutionary Claims and Visions in Psychotherapy: An Anthropathological Perspective

Abstract

Consideration of the semantic problem of revolution in psychotherapy is followed by some justifications for a critical and subjective approach to this discussion. Alleged revolutions in the field are critically examined, followed by an envisaged revolution and its possible ingredients. Attention is paid to the concept of a revolutionary new human, with affective-somatic and embodied-mystical examples given. Obstacles to such revolution are briefly examined and the concept of universal human sickness or anthropathology is discussed, along with the notion of an anti-anthropathological revolution.

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Correspondence to Colin Feltham.

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Feltham, C. Revolutionary Claims and Visions in Psychotherapy: An Anthropathological Perspective. J Contemp Psychother 39, 41–53 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10879-008-9102-4

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Keywords

  • Psychotherapy
  • Revolution
  • Anthropathology