Infliximab for Treatment of Granulomatous Disease in Patients with Common Variable Immunodeficiency

Abstract

Purpose

Eight to 22 % of common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) patients exhibit granulomas of the lungs, spleen, liver, and/or skin. Granulomas can be the most medically significant day-to-day problem for CVID patients. Currently, there are limited options for treatment of granulomas associated with CVID.

Methods

We treated five patients with CVID who exhibited significant clinical symptoms secondary to granulomas with infliximab. The patients were selected and treated based solely on clinical need and were not otherwise controlled or blinded to the therapy. After obtaining baseline studies (labs, spirometry, radiology) and excluding infection, they were treated with infliximab 5 mg/kg at week 0, 2, 6 and every 4 weeks thereafter.

Results

Post treatment improvements were seen in all 5 patients with significant clinical responses observed for both visceral and cutaneous granulomata. Four of the five patients were maintained on infliximab for 5 to 18 months (mean 9.4 months) without adverse reaction or increased susceptibility to infection. One patient completed 6 months of therapy with improvement of respiratory parameters but discontinued infliximab due to joint stiffness and rash that she attributed to the medication.

Conclusion

In our series, infliximab (5 mg/kg monthly) was an effective treatment for cutaneous and visceral granulomas in patients with CVID.

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Correspondence to Timothy J. Franxman or James R. Baker Jr..

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Franxman, T.J., Howe, L.E. & Baker, J.R. Infliximab for Treatment of Granulomatous Disease in Patients with Common Variable Immunodeficiency. J Clin Immunol 34, 820–827 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10875-014-0079-3

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Keywords

  • Infliximab
  • common variable immunodeficiency (CVID)
  • granuloma
  • TACI