Advertisement

Journal of Oceanography

, Volume 67, Issue 1, pp 87–111 | Cite as

Temporal variability in physicochemical properties, phytoplankton standing crop and primary production for 7 years (2002–2008) in the neritic area of Sagami Bay, Japan

  • Koichi AraEmail author
  • Koh Yamaki
  • Keisuke Wada
  • Satoshi Fukuyama
  • Takeshi Okutsu
  • Sadao Nagasaka
  • Akihiro Shiomoto
  • Juro Hiromi
Original Article

Abstract

Seasonal and interannual variations in physicochemical properties (i.e., temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen and dissolved inorganic nutrients), chlorophyll a (Chl-a), particulate carbon and nitrogen (PC and PN, respectively), and primary production were investigated in the neritic area of Sagami Bay, Kanagawa, Japan, from January 2002 to December 2008. These abiotic/biotic variables, except for NH4 +–N, repeated similar seasonal variations for all 7 years. On the basis of the analysis of data obtained on 167 sampling dates, depth-integrated primary production in this water can be easily estimated from Chl-a at the surface using the regression equations obtained in the present study. Intermittently high values of dissolved inorganic nutrients, Chl-a, PC, PN and primary productivity at the surface during the summer stratified period were induced by high freshwater discharge from the rivers after rainfalls and by the expansion of nutrient-rich Tokyo Bay Water. Temperature, salinity and dissolved inorganic nutrients showed drastic variations within a scale of a few days and/or weeks, and these variations were related to sea levels that represent the intrusion of the Kuroshio Water, Intermediate Oyashio Water or deep water from the continental slope. However, there was no consistent trend in the variations in Chl-a, PC, PN and primary production due to the complex effects of these waters.

Keywords

Physicochemical properties Primary production Dissolved inorganic nutrients Particulate matter Sagami Bay, Japan 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank Mr. Kazuharu Yuasa, captain/owner of the fishing boat “Genshun-maru” for his continuous helpful assistance in fieldwork. We thank Mr. Yoshiaki Yamada, Kanagawa Prefectural Fisheries Technology Center, Mr. Junji Kinoshita, Kanagawa Prefectural Fisheries Technology Center (now: Kanagawa Prefectural Government), and Dr. Takashige Sugimoto, Tokai University, for helpful assistance and valuable comments. Thanks are also due to all members who participated in “Project SHONAM” for helping with fieldwork and analyzing samples. This research was financially supported in part by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports Science and Technology of Japan through the “Open Research Center Project” of Nihon University.

References

  1. Ara K, Hiromi J (2007) Temporal variability in primary and copepod production in Sagami Bay, Japan. J Plankton Res 29(Suppl 1):185–196Google Scholar
  2. Ara K, Hiromi J (2008) Temporal variability and characterization of physicochemical properties in the neritic area of Sagami Bay, Japan. J Oceanogr 64:195–210CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Ara K, Hiromi J (2009) Seasonal variability in plankton food web structure and trophodynamics in the neritic area of Sagami Bay, Japan. J Oceanogr 65:757–779CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Aruga Y (1977) Productivity of phytoplankton (Suruga Bay and Sagami Bay). In: Hogetsu K, Hatanaka M, Hanaoka T, Kawamura T (eds) Productivity of biocenoses in coastal regions of Japan, JIBP synthesis, vol 14. University of Tokyo Press, Tokyo, pp 127–133Google Scholar
  5. Brzezinski MA (1985) The Si:C:N ratio of marine diatoms: interspecific variability and the effect of some environmental variables. J Phycol 21:347–357CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Brzezinski MA, Nelson DM (1995) The annual silica cycle in the Sargasso Sea near Bermuda. Deep Sea Res I 42:1215–1237CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. de Madariaga I (1992) Interspecific differences in the photosynthetic carbon metabolism of marine phytoplankton. Mar Biol 114:509–515CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Del Amo Y, Quéguiner B, Tréguer P, Breton H, Lampert L (1997) Impacts of high-nitrate freshwater inputs on macrotidal ecosystems. II. Specific role of the silicic acid pump in the year-round dominance of diatoms in the Bay of Brest (France). Mar Ecol Prog Ser 161:225–237CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Durbin EG, Krawiec RW, Smayda TJ (1975) Seasonal studies on the relative importance of different size fractions of phytoplankton in Narragansett Bay (USA). Limnol Oceanogr 32:271–287Google Scholar
  10. Fukuyama S (2010) Seasonal variability of the phytoplankton assemblages in the neritic water of Sagami Bay, Japan. MSc dissertation, Nihon University, FujisawaGoogle Scholar
  11. Furushima Y, Sugimoto T (1995) Effect of Tokyo Bay water on the water quality in the upper layer of Sagami Bay. Bull Japan Soc Fish Oceanogr 59:210–217Google Scholar
  12. Furuya K, Takahashi M, Nemoto T (1986) Summer phytoplankton community structure and growth in a regional upwelling area off Hachijo Island, Japan. J Exp Mar Biol Ecol 96:43–55CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Hama J, Handa N (1994) Variability of the biomass, chemical composition and productivity of phytoplankton in Kinu-ura Bay, Japan during the rainy season. Estuar Coast Shelf Sci 39:497–509Google Scholar
  14. Hama T, Miyazaki T, Ogawa Y, Iwakuma T, Takahashi M, Otsuki A, Ichimura S (1983) Measurement of photosynthetic production of a marine phytoplankton population using a stable 13C isotope. Mar Biol 73:31–36CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Han M-S, Furuya K (2000) Size and species-specific primary productivity and community structure of phytoplankton in Tokyo Bay. J Plankton Res 22:1221–1235CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Hansen HP, Koroleff F (1999) Determination of nutrients. In: Grasshoff K, Kremling K, Ehrhardt M (eds) Methods of seawater analysis, 3rd edn. Wiely-VCH, Weinheim, pp 159–228CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Harrison WG, Platt T (1980) Variations in assimilation number of coastal marine phytoplankton: effects of environmental co-variates. J Plankton Res 2:249–260CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Hashimoto H, Hashimoto T, Matsuda O, Tada K, Tamai K, Uye S, Yamamoto T (1997) Biological productivity of lower trophic levels of the Seto Inland Sea of Japan. In: Okaichi T, Yanagi T (eds) Sustainable development in the Seto Inland Sea, Japan: from the viewpoint of fisheries. Terra Scientific Publishing Company, Tokyo, pp 17–58Google Scholar
  19. Hogetsu K, Taga N (1977) Suruga Bay and Sagami Bay. In: Hogetsu K, Hatanaka M, Hanaoka T, Kawamura T (eds) Productivity of biocenoses in coastal regions of Japan, JIBP synthesis, vol 14. University of Tokyo Press, Tokyo, pp 31–172Google Scholar
  20. Holm-Hansen O, Lorenzen C J, Holmes RW, Strickland JDH (1965) Fluorometric determination of chlorophyll. J Cons Perm Int Explor Mer 30:3–15Google Scholar
  21. Ichikawa T, Hirota Y (2004) Seasonal changes of primary productivity in Tosa Bay, Japan. Oceanogr Japan 13:259–269Google Scholar
  22. Iriarte A, Purdie DA (1994) Size distribution of chlorophyll a biomass and primary production in a temperate estuary (Southampton Water): the contribution of photosynthetic picoplankton. Mar Ecol Prog Ser 115:283–297CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Ishizaka J, Takahashi M, Ichimura S (1983) Evaluation of coastal upwelling effects on phytoplankton growth by simulated culture experiments. Mar Biol 76:271–278CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Justić D, Rabalais NN, Turner RE, Dortch Q (1995) Changes in nutrient structure of river-dominated coastal waters: stoichiometric nutrient balance and its consequence. Estuar Coast Shelf Sci 40:339–356CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Kamatani A, Ikeda F (1985) Chemistry. In: Coastal Oceanography Research Committee, The Oceanographic Society of Japan (eds) Oceanography in Japanese islands. Tokai University Press, Tokyo, pp 410–416Google Scholar
  26. Kamatani A, Oku O, Tsuji H, Maeda M, Yamada Y (2000) The distribution and fate of nutrients in Sagami Bay. Nippon Suisan Gakkaishi 66:70–79Google Scholar
  27. Kanagawa Prefecture (2004) Annual report on a water quality investigation in Kanagawa Prefecture, 2001. Yokohama, Kanagawa PrefectureGoogle Scholar
  28. Kanagawa Prefecture (2005a) Annual report on a water quality investigation in Kanagawa Prefecture, 2002. Yokohama, Kanagawa PrefectureGoogle Scholar
  29. Kanagawa Prefecture (2005b) Annual report on a water quality investigation in Kanagawa Prefecture, 2003. Yokohama, Kanagawa PrefectureGoogle Scholar
  30. Kanagawa Prefecture (2006) Annual report on a water quality investigation in Kanagawa Prefecture, 2004. Yokohama, Kanagawa PrefectureGoogle Scholar
  31. Kanagawa Prefecture (2007) Annual report on a water quality investigation in Kanagawa Prefecture, 2005. Yokohama, Kanagawa PrefectureGoogle Scholar
  32. Kanagawa Prefecture (2008) Annual report on a water quality investigation in Kanagawa Prefecture, 2006. Yokohama, Kanagawa PrefectureGoogle Scholar
  33. Kanagawa Prefecture (2009) Annual report on a water quality investigation in Kanagawa Prefecture, 2007. Yokohama, Kanagawa PrefectureGoogle Scholar
  34. Kaneda A, Takeoka H, Nagura E, Koizumi Y (2002) Periodic intrusion of cold water from the Pacific Ocean into the bottom layer of the Bungo Channel in Japan. J Oceanogr 58:547–556CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Kasai A, Kimura S, Sugimoto T (1993) Warm water intrusion from the Kuroshio into the coastal areas south of Japan. J Oceanogr 49:607–625CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Kawabe M (1980) Sea level variations along south coast of Japan and the large meander in the Kuroshio. J Oceanogr Soc Japan 36:97–104CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Kawabe M (1989) Sea level changes south of Japan associated with the non-large-meander path of the Kuroshio. J Oceanogr Soc Japan 45:181–189CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Kimoto K, Nakashima J, Morioka Y (1987) Standing stock of chlorophyll a and primary productivity in a small inlet of Kyushu. Bull Seikai Reg Fish Lab 64:35–46Google Scholar
  39. Kormas KA, Garametsi V, Nicolaidou A (2002) Size-fractionated phytoplankton chlorophyll in an Eastern Mediterranean coastal system (Maliakos Gulf, Grees). Helgol Mar Res 56:125–133CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Kudo Y, Yamaguchi Y (2000) Primary productivity in Sagami Bay. Cruise reports, Tokyo University of Fisheries, vol 9, pp 161–164Google Scholar
  41. Kuosa H (1991) Picoplanktonic algae in the northern Baltic Sea: seasonal dynamics and flagellate grazing. Mar Ecol Prog Ser 73:269–276CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Laws EA, Landry MR, Barber RT, Cambell L, Dickson M-L, Marra J (2000) Carbon cycling in primary production bottle incubations: inferences from grazing experiments and photosynthetic studies using 14C and 18O in the Arabian Sea. Deep Sea Res II 47:1339–1352CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Machida M, Fujitomi M, Hasegawa K, Kudo T, Kai M, Kobayashi T, Uede T (1999) Red tide of Ceratium furca along the Pacific coast of central Japan in 1997. Nippon Suisan Gakkaishi 65:755–756Google Scholar
  44. Maita Y, Odate T (1988) Seasonal changes in size-fractionated primary production and nutrient concentrations in the temperate neritic water of Funka Bay, Japan. J Oceanogr Soc Japan 44:268–279CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Marra J (1995) Primary production in the North Atlantic: measurements, scaling and optical determinations. Proc R Soc Ser B 348:153–160Google Scholar
  46. Marra J (2003) 14C-uptake by phytoplankton, now and in the future. Limnol Oceanogr Bull 12:1–3Google Scholar
  47. Matsuyama M, Iwata S (1977) The Kyucho in Sagami Bay (I). Bull Japan Soc Fish Oceanogr 30:1–7Google Scholar
  48. Matsuyama M, Ishidoya H, Iwata S, Kitade Y, Nagamatsu H (1999) Kyucho induced by intrusion of Kuroshio water in Sagami Bay, Japan. Cont Shelf Res 19:1561–1575CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Menden-Deuer S, Lessard EJ (2000) Carbon to volume relationships for dinoflagellates, diatoms, and other protist plankton. Limnol Oceanogr 45:569–579CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  50. Mitbavkar S, Saino T, Horimoto N, Kanda J, Ishimaru T (2009) Role of environment and hydrography in determining the picoplankton community structure of Sagami Bay. J Oceanogr 65:195–208CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  51. Miyaguchi H, Fujiki T, Kikuchi T, Kuwahara VS, Toda T (2006) Relationship between the bloom of Noctiluca scintillans and environmental factors in the coastal waters of Sagami Bay, Japan. J Plankton Res 28:313–324CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. Miyazawa M, Matsuyama M, Iwata S, Kohara M (1980) Effect of the movements of the Kuroshio axis on the hydrographic conditions in and around the Sagami-nada. Bull Japan Soc Fish Oceanogr 37:1–6Google Scholar
  53. Miyazono A, Odate T, Maita Y (1992) Seasonal fluctuations of cell density of cyanobacteria and other picophytoplankton in Iwanai Bay, Hokkaido, Japan. J Oceanogr 48:257–266CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  54. Montagnes DJS, Berges JA, Harrison PJ, Taylor FJR (1994) Estimating carbon, nitrogen, protein, and chlorophyll a from volume in marine phytoplankton. Limnol Oceanogr 39:1044–1060CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  55. Motoda S, Kawamura T, Nishizawa S (1977) Akkeshi Bay. In: Hogetsu K, Hatanaka M, Hanaoka T, Kawamura T (eds) Productivity of biocenoses in coastal regions of Japan, JIBP synthesis, vol 14. University of Tokyo Press, Tokyo, pp 223–265Google Scholar
  56. Nagata Y, Takeuchi J, Uchida M, Ishikura I, Morikawa Y, Koike T (1999) Current nature of the Kuroshio in the vicinity of the Kii Peninsula. J Oceanogr 55:407–416CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  57. Nishizawa S (1977) Primary Production (Sendai Bay). In: Hogetsu K, Hatanaka M, Hanaoka T, Kawamura T (eds) Productivity of biocenoses in coastal regions of Japan, JIBP synthesis, vol 14. University of Tokyo Press, Tokyo, pp 184–189Google Scholar
  58. Noda Y, Ichimura S (1967) Primary production in Sagami Bay in the summer of 1964. Inform Bull Planktol Japan Commem. No. Dr. Y. Matsue, pp 183–186Google Scholar
  59. Odate T (1989) Seasonal changes in cell density of cyanobacteria and other picophytoplankton populations in Funka Bay, Japan. Bull Plankton Soc Japan 36:53–61Google Scholar
  60. Okutsu T (2008) Seasonal succession of plankton food web structure and trophodynamics in the Neritic Area of Sagami Bay, Japan. MSc dissertation, Nihon University, Fujisawa, pp 80Google Scholar
  61. Ozaki K, Uye S, Kusumoto T, Hagino T (2004) Interannual variability of the ecosystem of the Kii Channel, the Inland Sea of Japan, as influenced by bottom intrusion of cold and nutrient-rich water from the Pacific Ocean, and a recent trend of warming and oligotrophication. Fish Oceanogr 13:65–79CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  62. Parsons TR, Takahashi M (1973) Environmental control of phytoplankton cell size. Limnol Oceanogr 18:511–515CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  63. Parsons TR, Maita Y, Lalli CM (1984a) A manual of chemical and biological methods for seawater analysis. Pergamon Press, Oxford, p 173Google Scholar
  64. Parsons TR, Takahashi M, Hargrave B (1984b) Biological oceanographic processes, 3rd edn. Pergamon Press, Oxford, p 329Google Scholar
  65. Raymont JEG (1980) Plankton and productivity in the oceans, 2nd edn, vol 1. In: Phytoplankton. Pergamon Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  66. Redfield AC, Ketchum BH, Richards FA (1963) The influence of organisms on the composition of seawater. In: Hill MN (ed) The sea, vol 2. Wiley, New York, pp 26–77Google Scholar
  67. Saitou K (1992) Year to year variations in water quality in the coastal areas in Sagami Bay. Bull Japan Soc Fish Oceanogr 56:328–334Google Scholar
  68. Senjyu T, Asano N, Matsuyama M, Ishimaru T (1998) Intrusion events of the Intermediate Oyashio Water into Sagami Bay, Japan. J Oceanogr 54:29–44CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  69. Shimizu K, Yamada Y, Iwata S, Itou K (1997) On the inversion of water temperature observed at June 1992 in Sagami Bay. Bull Kanagawa Pref Fish Res Inst 2:101–108Google Scholar
  70. Shimura S, Ichimura S (1972) Primary productivity in coastal water adjacent to the Kuroshio off Shimoda. J Oceanogr Soc Japan 28:8–17CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  71. Shinada A, Ban S, Ikeda T (2003) Seasonal changes in nano/micro-zooplankton herbivory and heterotrophic nano-flagellates bacterivory off Cape Esan, southern Hokkaido, Japan. J Oceanogr 59:609–618CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  72. Strickland JDH, Parsons TR (1972) A practical handbook of seawater analysis, 2nd edn, No. 167. Bull Fish Res Bd Canada, OttawaGoogle Scholar
  73. Suzumura M, Kobun H, Arata N (2004) Distribution and characteristics of suspended particulate matter in a heavily eutrophic estuary, Tokyo Bay, Japan. Mar Pollut Bull 49:496–503CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  74. Tada K, Monaka K, Morishita M, Hashimoto T (1998) Standing stocks and production rates of phytoplankton and abundance of bacteria in the Seto Inland Sea, Japan. J Oceanogr 54:285–295CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  75. Tada K, Morishita M, Hamada K, Montani S, Yamada M (2001) Standing stock and production rate of phytoplankton and a red tide outbreak in a heavily eutrophic embayment, Dokai Bay, Japan. Mar Poll Bull 42:1177–1186CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  76. Takahashi M, Koike I, Ishimaru T, Saino T, Furuya K, Fujita Y, Hattori A, Ichimura S (1980) Upwelling plumes in Sagami Bay and adjacent water around the Izu Island, Japan. J Oceanogr Soc Japan 36:209–216CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  77. Takashi T, Fujiwara T, Sumitomo T, Sakamoto W (2006) Prediction of slope water intrusion into the Kii Channel in summer. J Oceanogr 62:105–113CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  78. Tanaka K (1993) A condition of water pollution in Sagami Bay and inflowing rivers. Bull Japan Soc Fish Oceanogr 57:249–255Google Scholar
  79. Tanaka T, Sano M (1980) Dynamic aspects of primary production by phytoplankton in eutrophic Mikawa Bay, Japan. Bull Plankton Soc Japan 27:75–85Google Scholar
  80. Tashiro M (2004) Seasonal variations of the phytoplankton assemblages and their relating environmental factors off Enoshima Island in Sagami Bay. MSc dissertation, Nihon University, FujisawaGoogle Scholar
  81. Turpin JA, Harrison PJ (1979) Limiting nutrient patchiness and its role in phytoplankton ecology. J Exp Mar Biol Ecol 39:151–166CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  82. Uye S, Kuwata H, Endo T (1987) Standing stocks and production rates of phytoplankton and planktonic copepods in the Inland Sea of Japan. J Oceanogr Soc Japan 42:421–434CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  83. Volkman JV, Tanoue E (2002) Chemical and biological studies of particulate organic matter in the ocean. J Oceanogr 58:265–279CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  84. Yamada Y (1997) The strange color of sea occurred in Tokyo Bay and Sagami Bay, May 1996. Bull Kanagawa Pref Fish Res Inst 2:65–75Google Scholar
  85. Yamada Y, Iwata S (1992) Recent trend of marine environment in Sagami Bay. Bull Japan Soc Fish Oceanogr 56:323–327Google Scholar
  86. Yamada Y, Matsushita S (2005) Environmental properties in the coastal area of Sagami Bay. Bull Japan Soc Fish Oceanogr 69:208–212Google Scholar
  87. Yamada Y, Matsushita S (2006) Estimation of pollution loads of nitrogen, phosphorus and COD to Sagami Bay by using water quality data of the influent rivers. Bull Kanagawa Pref Fish Tech Center 1:43–49Google Scholar
  88. Yamaguchi M, Anraku M (1984) Primary productivity in Suō-Nada, western Seto Inland Sea. Bull Nansei Reg Fish Res Lab 17:135–149Google Scholar
  89. Yamaguchi M, Imai I (1996) Size fractioned phytoplankton biomass and primary productivity in Osaka Bay, eastern Seto Inland Sea, Japan. Bull Nansei Natl Fish Res Inst 29:59–73Google Scholar
  90. Yamaguchi Y, Satoh H, Aruga Y (1991) Seasonal changes of organic carbon and nitrogen produced by phytoplankton in the estuary of River Tamagawa. Mar Pollut Bull 23:723–725CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  91. Yamamoto T, Hashimoto T, Matsuda O, Tada K (1999) Phytoplanktonic N:P ratio in waters of the Seto Inland Sea, Japan, and the possible factors affecting its fluctuation. Bull Japan Soc Fish Oceanogr 63:6–13Google Scholar
  92. Yang SK, Nagata Y, Taira K, Kawabe M (1993) Southward intrusion of the Intermediate Oyashio Water along the east coast of the Boso Peninsula, Japan. II. Intrusion events into Sagami Bay. J Oceamogr 49:173–191CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Oceanographic Society of Japan and Springer 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Koichi Ara
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Koh Yamaki
    • 2
  • Keisuke Wada
    • 2
  • Satoshi Fukuyama
    • 2
  • Takeshi Okutsu
    • 2
  • Sadao Nagasaka
    • 2
    • 3
  • Akihiro Shiomoto
    • 4
    • 5
  • Juro Hiromi
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Marine Science and Resources, College of Bioresource SciencesNihon UniversityFujisawaJapan
  2. 2.Research Division in Biological Environment Studies, Graduate School of Bioresource SciencesNihon UniversityFujisawaJapan
  3. 3.Department of Bioenvironmental and Agricultural Engineering, College of Bioresource SciencesNihon UniversityFujisawaJapan
  4. 4.National Research Institute of Fisheries Science, Fisheries Research AgencyYokohamaJapan
  5. 5.Department of Aquatic Bioscience, Faculty of BioindustryTokyo University of AgricultureAbashiriJapan

Personalised recommendations