Skip to main content

Work–Family Conflict: The Importance of Family-Friendly Employment Practices and Family-Supportive Supervisors

Abstract

In the study reported in this paper, we examined the relationship between the use of four family-friendly employment practices (i.e., telecommuting, ability to take work home, flexible work hours, and family leave) and work–family conflict. In addition, we examined whether reporting to a family-supportive supervisor was related to the use of the four practices and to work–family conflict. We found that the use of three of the four practices was related to work–family conflict. In addition, our results showed that reporting to a family-supportive supervisor was related to the use of certain practices and to work–family conflict.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Fig. 1

References

  • Allen, T. D. (2001). Family-supportive environments: The role of organizational perceptions. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 58, 414–435.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Breaugh, J. A. (2003). Effect size estimation: Factors to consider and mistakes to avoid. Journal of Management, 29, 79–97.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Brough, P., O’Driscoll, M. P., & Kalliath, T. J. (2005). The ability of “family friendly” organizational resources to predict work–family conflict and job and family satisfaction. Stress and Health, 21, 223–234.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Byron, K. (2005). A meta-analytic review of work–family conflict and its antecedents. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 67, 169–198.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Carlson, D. S., & Perrewe, P. L. (1999). The role of social support in the stressor-strain relationship: An examination of work–family conflict. Journal of Management, 25, 513–540.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Casper, W. J., & Buffardi, L. C. (2004). Work-life benefits and job pursuit intentions: The role of anticipated organizational support. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 65, 391–410.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Desrochers, S., Hilton, J., & Larwood, L. (2005). Preliminary validation of the work–family integration-blurring scale. Journal of Family Issues, 26, 442–466.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Eby, L. T., Casper, W. J., Lockwood, A., Bordeaux, C., & Brinley, A. (2005). Work and family research in IO/OB: Content analysis and review of the literature (1980–2002). Journal of Vocational Behavior, 66, 124–197.

    Google Scholar 

  • Glass, J. L., & Finley, A. (2002). Coverage and effectiveness of family-responsive workplace policies. Human Resource Management Review, 12, 313–337.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Golden, T. D. (2006). The role of relationships in understanding telecommuter satisfaction. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 27, 319–340.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Golden, T. D., & Veiga, J. F. (2005). The impact of telecommuting on job satisfaction: Resolving inconsistent findings. Journal of Management, 31, 301–318.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Hammer, L. B., Bauer, T. N., & Grandey, A. A. (2003). Work–family conflict and work-related withdrawal behaviors. Journal of Business and Psychology, 17, 419–436.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Hammer, L. B., Neal, M. B., Newson, J. T., Brockwood, K. J., & Colton, C. L. (2005). A longitudinal study of the effects of dual-earner couples’ utilization of family-friendly workplace supports on work and family outcomes. Journal of Applied Psychology, 90, 799–810.

    PubMed  Article  Google Scholar 

  • Kenny, D. A., Kashy, D. A., & Bolger, N. (1998). Data analysis in social psychology. In D. Gilbert, S. Fiske, & G. Lindzey (Eds.), The handbook of social psychology (4th ed., Vol. 1, pp. 233–165). Boston, MA: McGraw-Hill.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kossek, E. E. (2005). Workplace policies and practices to support work and families. In S. Bianchi, L. Casper, & R. King (Eds.), Work, family health and well-being (pp. 97–116). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kossek, E. E., Lautsch, B. A., & Eaton, S. C. (2006). Telecommuting, control, and boundary management: Correlates of policy use and practice, job control, and work–family effectiveness. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 68, 347–367.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Madsen, S. R. (2003). The effects of home-based teleworking on work–family conflict. Human Resource Development Quarterly, 14, 35–58.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Netemeyer, R. G., Boles, J., & McMurrian, R. (1996). Development and validation of work–family conflict and family–work conflict scales. Journal of Applied Psychology, 81, 400–409.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • O’Driscoll, M. P., Poelmans, S., Spector, P. E., Kalliath, T., Allen, T. D., Cooper, C. L., et al. (2003). Family-responsive interventions, perceived organizational and supervisor support, work–family conflict, and psychological strain. International Journal of Stress Management, 10, 326–344.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Shinn, M., Wong, N. W., Simko, P. A., & Ortiz-Torres, B. (1989). Promoting the well-being of working parents: Coping, social support, and flexible job schedules. American Journal of Community Psychology, 17, 31–35.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Thomas, L. T., & Ganster, D. C. (1995). Impact of family-supportive work variables on work–family conflict and strain: A control perspective. Journal of Applied Psychology, 80, 6–15.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Thompson, C. A., Beauvais, L. L., & Lyness, K. S. (1999). When work–family benefits are not enough: The influence of work–family culture on benefit utilization, organizational attachment, and work–family conflict. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 54, 392–415.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Towers Perrin. (2006). Winning strategies for a global workforce. http://www.towersperrin.com.

  • Warren, J. A., & Johnson, P. J. (1995). The impact of workplace support on work–family role strain. Family Relations, 44, 163–169.

    Article  Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to James A. Breaugh.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Breaugh, J.A., Frye, N.K. Work–Family Conflict: The Importance of Family-Friendly Employment Practices and Family-Supportive Supervisors. J Bus Psychol 22, 345–353 (2008). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10869-008-9081-1

Download citation

  • Published:

  • Issue Date:

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10869-008-9081-1

Keywords

  • Work–family conflict
  • Family-friendly practices
  • Family-supportive supervisor