Relationship between self-care adherence, time perspective, readiness to change and executive function in patients with heart failure

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between self-care adherence, time perspective (TP), readiness to change (RTC) and executive function in heart failure (HF) self-care. 147 heart failure patients completed questionnaires on self-care, TP, RTC; and cognitive tasks that reflect working memory and inhibition. Positive correlation was found between self-care, future-oriented TP (r = 0.362, P = 0.01), RTC (r = 0.184, P = 0.05) and working memory (r = 0.174, P = 0.01). Mediation analysis elucidated the indirect effect of RTC on self-care through TP (B = 1.205, bias-corrected bootstrapped at 95% confidence interval 0.532, 2.145) explaining 62.0% of the total effect. Working memory did not moderate this relationship and inhibition did not predict self-care. Self-care scores were lower than cut-off of 70 (mean = 51.2, standard deviation = 17.2). Age (r = − 0.220), staying alone (r = − 0.270) income < 1000 (r = − 0.270) and not having formal education (r = − 0.165) were correlated with TP. Healthcare professionals could motivate HF patients to perform regular self-care behaviours by tailoring interventions according to their TP and RTC.

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Acknowledgements

We would like to thank the doctors and nurses from the National Heart Centre Singapore for their support in our patient recruitment.

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Correspondence to Han Shi Jocelyn Chew.

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Chew Han Shi Jocelyn, Sim Kheng Leng David, Choi Kai Chow, and Chair Sek Ying declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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All procedures followed were in accordance with ethical standards of the responsible committee on human experimentation (institutional and national) and with the Helsinki Declaration of 1975, as revised in 2000. Informed consent was obtained from all patients for being included in the study.

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Chew, H.S.J., Sim, K.L.D., Choi, K.C. et al. Relationship between self-care adherence, time perspective, readiness to change and executive function in patients with heart failure. J Behav Med 43, 1–11 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10865-019-00080-x

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Keywords

  • Executive function
  • Heart failure
  • Self-care
  • Self-management
  • Self-regulation
  • Time perspective