Teaching Behavior Analysis to Pre-service Teachers in their Nonnative Language: Does Method Matter?

Abstract

Expanding the field of behavior analysis allows empirically validated practices to be more accessible for children impacted by autism, developmental disabilities, and behavioral challenges. However, even with the global advancement of applied behavior analysis (ABA) getting the science into the area where children spend most of their time, schools, can be a challenge. Professional development for teachers in the area of ABA has been previously investigated. However, incorporating ABA coursework into pre-service teacher training does not have a strong research base. Looking specifically at teaching ABA coursework in English to a group of speakers of English as a second language is even more novel. Therefore, the aim of this investigation was to use an alternating treatments design in an undergraduate pre-service teacher ABA elective course to evaluate the effectiveness and social validity of information delivery in two different formats: in-person lecture and online recorded lecture. The findings of the study did not show a difference in student course performance based on delivery method, but did show variations in preferences. Overall, the blended model of instruction proved effective in disseminating ABA to pre-service teachers in their nonnative language with promising reports for future usage.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Fig. 1
Fig. 2
Fig. 3

Data availability

The data that support the findings of this study are available from the corresponding author upon reasonable request.

References

  1. Alberto, P., & Troutman, A. C. (2013). Applied behavior analysis for teachers. Upper saddle river. New Jersy: Pearson.

    Google Scholar 

  2. Allen, K. A., & Bowles, T. V. (2014). Examining the effects of brief training on the attitudes and future use of behavioral methods by teachers. Behavioral Interventions, 29(1), 62–76. https://doi.org/10.1002/bin.1376.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  3. Aragon, S. R., Johnson, S. D., & Shaik, N. (2002). The influence of learning style preferences on student success in online versus face-to-face environments. The American Journal of Distance Education, 16(4), 227–243. https://doi.org/10.1207/S15389286AJDE1604_3.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  4. Ardila, R. (2006). Prologue: Behaviour analysis around the world. International Journal of Psychology, 41(6), 433–435. https://doi.org/10.1080/00207590500495180.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  5. Autism Speaks. (2019). About us.https://www.autismspeaks.org/about-us.

  6. Campbell, N. (2007). Bringing ESL students out of their shells: Enhancing participation through online discussion. Business Communication Quarterly, 70(1), 37–43.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  7. Chamak, B. (2008). Autism and social movements: French parents’ associations and international autistic individuals’ organisations. Sociology of Health and Illness, 30(1), 76–96. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9566.2007.01053.x.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  8. Chang, K., & Zaroff, C. M. (2017). Applied behavior analysis in autism spectrum disorders in China and Hong Kong. Acta Psychopathologica, 3(52), 1–5. https://doi.org/10.4172/2469-6676.100124.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  9. Dufrene, B. A., Doggett, R. A., Henington, C., & Watson, T. S. (2007). Functional assessment and intervention for disruptive classroom behaviors in preschool and head start classrooms. Journal of Behavioral Education, 16(4), 368–388. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10864-007-9048-8.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  10. Dutton Tillery, A., Varjas, K., Meyers, J., & Collins, A. S. (2010). General education teachers’ perceptions of behavior management and intervention strategies. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 12(2), 86–102. https://doi.org/10.1177/1098300708330879.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  11. Enoch, M. R., & Dixon, M. R. (2019). Neuro-typical children outcomes from an acceptance and commitment therapy summer camp. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 12(2), 343–352. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40617-018-00319-0.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  12. Fennell, B., & Dillenburger, K. (2018). Applied behaviour analysis: What do teachers of students with autism spectrum disorder know. International Journal of Educational Research, 87, 110–118. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijer.2016.06.012.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  13. Gandalovicova, J. (2016). The arrival of ABA in the Czech Republic. European Association for Behavior Analysis Newsletter. https://www.europeanaba.org/.

  14. Goin-Kochel, R. P., Myers, B. J., Hendricks, D. R., Carr, S. E., & Wiley, S. B. (2007). Early responsiveness to intensive behavioural intervention predicts outcomes among preschool children with autism. International Journal of Disability, Development and Education, 54(2), 151–175. https://doi.org/10.1080/10349120701330404.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  15. Grey, I. M., Honan, R., McClean, B., & Daly, M. (2005). Evaluating the effectiveness of teacher training in applied behaviour analysis. Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 9(3), 209–227. https://doi.org/10.1177/1744629505056695.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  16. Hanley, G. P., Heal, N. A., Tiger, J. H., & Ingvarsson, E. T. (2007). Evaluation of a classwide teaching program for developing preschool life skills. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 40(2), 277–300. https://doi.org/10.1901/jaba.2007.57-06.

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  17. Kalgotra, R., & Warwal, J. S. (2017). Effect of music intervention on the behaviour disorders of children with intellectual disability using strategies from applied behaviour analysis. Disability, CBR and Inclusive Development, 28(1), 161–177. https://doi.org/10.5463/dcid.v28i1.584.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  18. Kern, L., Bambara, L., & Fogt, J. (2002). Class-wide curricular modification to improve the behavior of students with emotional or behavioral disorders. Behavioral Disorders, 27(4), 317–326. https://doi.org/10.1177/019874290202700408.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  19. Kingsdorf, S., & Pančocha, K. (2020). A survey of the use of applied behaviour analysis for children with autism in the Czech Republic. European Journal of Special Needs Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/08856257.2020.1726092.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  20. Kunin, M., Julliard, K. N., & Rodriguez, T. E. (2014). Comparing face-to-face, synchronous, and asynchronous learning: postgraduate dental resident preferences. Journal of Dental Education, 78(6), 856–866. https://doi.org/10.1002/j.0022-0337.2014.78.6.tb05739.x.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  21. Larson, D. K., & Sung, C. H. (2009). Comparing student performance: Online versus blended versus face-to-face. Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks, 13(1), 31–42.

    Google Scholar 

  22. McCabe, H. (2007). Parent advocacy in the face of adversity: Autism and families in the People's Republic of China. Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, 22(1), 39–50. https://doi.org/10.1177/10883576070220010501.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  23. Ministry of Education (2020). Department of Statistics, Analysis and Development eEducation Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports. https://sberdat.uiv.cz/rozcestnik/.

  24. Moderato, P., & Presti, G. (2006). Behaviourism and the science of behaviour: Its development in Italy. International Journal of Psychology, 41(6), 480–485. https://doi.org/10.1080/00207590500492419.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  25. Newlin, M. H., Lavooy, M. J., & Wang, A. Y. (2005). An experimental comparison of conventional and web-based instructional formats. North American Journal of Psychology, 7(2).

  26. Omar, H., Embi, M. A., & Yunus, M. M. (2012). ESL learners' interaction in an online discussion via Facebook. Asian Social Science, 8(11), 67. https://doi.org/10.5539/ass.v8n11p67.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  27. Orsini, M., & Smith, M. (2010). Social movements, knowledge and public policy: the case of autism activism in Canada and the US. Critical Policy Studies, 4(1), 38–57. https://doi.org/10.1080/19460171003714989.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  28. Peters-Scheffer, N., Didden, R., Korzilius, H., & Sturmey, P. (2011). A meta-analytic study on the effectiveness of comprehensive ABA-based early intervention programs for children with autism spectrum disorders. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 5(1), 60–69. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rasd.2010.03.011.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  29. Rios, C., & Andrada, B. C. (2015). The changing face of autism in Brazil. Culture, Medicine, and Psychiatry, 39(2), 213–234. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11013-015-9448-5.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  30. Roll-Pettersson, L., & Ala'I-Rosales, S. (2009). Using blended and guided technologies in a university course for scientist-practitioners: Teaching applied behaviour analysis to autism professionals. Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 13(2), 113–142. https://doi.org/10.1177/1744629509340179.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  31. Roll-Pettersson, L., Ala’I-Rosales, S., Keenan, M., & Dillenburger, K. (2010). Teaching and learning technologies in higher education: Applied behaviour analysis and autism;“Necessity is the mother of invention”. European Journal of Behavior Analysis, 11(2), 247–259. https://doi.org/10.1080/15021149.2010.11434349.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  32. Salomone, E., Beranová, Š., Bonnet-Brilhault, F., Briciet Lauritsen, M., Budisteanu, M., Buitelaar, J., et al. (2016). Use of early intervention for young children with autism spectrum disorder across Europe. Autism, 20(2), 233–249. https://doi.org/10.1177/1362361315577218.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  33. Shepley, C., Allday, R. A., & Shepley, S. B. (2018). Towards a meaningful analysis of behavior analyst preparation programs. Behavior analysis in practice, 11(1), 39–45. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40617-017-0193-9.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  34. Skinner, B. F. (1957). Verbal behavior. New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts.

    Google Scholar 

  35. Van Der Heyden, A. M., Witt, J. C., & Gilbertson, D. (2007). A multi-year evaluation of the effects of a response to intervention (RTI) model on identification of children for special education. Journal of School Psychology, 45(2), 225–256. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2006.11.004.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  36. Vargas, J. S. (2013). Behavior analysis for effective teaching. New York: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  37. Westling, D. L. (2010). Teachers and challenging behavior: Knowledge, views, and practices. Remedial and Special Education, 31(1), 48–63. https://doi.org/10.1177/0741932508327466.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  38. Wood, S. J., Murdock, J. Y., & Cronin, M. E. (2002). Self-monitoring and at-risk middle school students: Academic performance improves, maintains, and generalizes. Behavior Modification, 26(5), 605–626. https://doi.org/10.1177/014544502236653.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  39. Zacharis, N. Z. (2011). The effect of learning style on preference for web-based courses and learning outcomes. British Journal of Educational Technology, 42(5), 790–800. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8535.2010.01104.x.

    Article  Google Scholar 

Download references

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to acknowledge the participation of the practitioners and the financial support of a grant from the Ministry of Education, Youth, and Sports of the Czech Republic with the Project No. CZ.02.2.69/0.0/0.0/16_027/0008360.

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Sheri Kingsdorf.

Ethics declarations

Conflict of interest

The authors have no conflict of interest to declare.

Ethics Statement

The manuscript and research reported adheres to the ethical policies described in the Author Guidelines.

Additional information

Publisher's Note

Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Kingsdorf, S., Pančocha, K. Teaching Behavior Analysis to Pre-service Teachers in their Nonnative Language: Does Method Matter?. J Behav Educ (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10864-020-09409-y

Download citation

Keywords

  • Pre-service teacher training
  • ABA dissemination
  • ESL learners
  • Instruction delivery