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Can SMART Training Really Increase Intelligence? A Replication Study

Abstract

A burgeoning research stream supports the efficacy of a novel behavior-analytic intervention, known as SMART training, in raising general intelligence by training a set of crucial cognitive skills, referred to as relational skills. A sample of Irish secondary school students (n = 26) was divided into two IQ matched groups, with the experimental group receiving 12 weeks of SMART training delivered in bi-weekly 45-min sessions. WASI IQ assessments were administered at baseline and follow-up to all participants by blind testers. For each of the three WASI IQ indices and the four IQ subtests, significant follow-up rises were found for the experimental group only. Analyses of variance indicated a significant effect of training on Verbal IQ, Matrix Reasoning and Vocabulary scores. Results lend further support for the efficacy of the SMART training program in enhancing intellectual skills.

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Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank the teachers and pupils of Confey College Leixlip, Ireland, for their generosity in terms of facilitating this study.

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Correspondence to Dylan Colbert.

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Bryan Roche declares a conflict of interest in having a commercial involvement in the public website RaiseYourIQ.com which offers online SMART training.

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Colbert, D., Tyndall, I., Roche, B. et al. Can SMART Training Really Increase Intelligence? A Replication Study. J Behav Educ 27, 509–531 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10864-018-9302-2

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Keywords

  • Strengthening mental abilities with relational training
  • Relational frame theory
  • Derived relational responding
  • Intelligence
  • Educational intervention