The Effectiveness of Using a Video iPod as a Prompting Device in Employment Settings

  • Toni Van Laarhoven
  • Jesse W. Johnson
  • Traci Van Laarhoven-Myers
  • Kristin L. Grider
  • Katie M. Grider
Original Paper

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of using a video iPod as a prompting device for teaching three job-related tasks to a young man with developmental disabilities in a community-based employment setting. The effectiveness of the prompting device was evaluated using a multiple probe across behaviors design. Results indicated that the introduction of the video iPod was associated with immediate and substantial gains in independent correct responding with an associated decrease in the number of prompts given from a job coach. In addition, the participant used the video iPod independently. Instructional implications and future research will be discussed.

Keywords

Video prompting Video feedback Video iPod Developmental disabilities Employment 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Toni Van Laarhoven
    • 1
  • Jesse W. Johnson
    • 1
  • Traci Van Laarhoven-Myers
    • 2
  • Kristin L. Grider
    • 1
  • Katie M. Grider
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Teaching & Learning, Graham Hall 240Northern Illinois UniversityDeKalbUSA
  2. 2.Indian Prairie School District #204AuroraUSA

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