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Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education

, Volume 21, Issue 1, pp 5–34 | Cite as

Audible conversational affordances and constraints of verbalizing professional noticing during prospective teacher lesson study

  • Julie M. Amador
  • Ingrid S. Carter
Article

Abstract

Lesson Study, which assumes multiple variations, is a collaborative method that provides an opportunity for teachers to notice professionally. We analyzed how audible conversational components afforded and constrained the verbalization of professional noticing of a lesson study team. The team, comprised of six prospective teachers, a classroom teacher, and a university facilitator, participated in weekly lesson study cycles in a teacher education program. Results indicate that a structured lesson study process afforded professional noticing as participants attended to and analyzed students’ thinking. However, noticing was constrained by shifts in the conversation content and lengthy segments of individuals exerting expertise. Findings indicate that the facilitator played a crucial role in increasing the incidence of professional noticing and also contributed to the decline of noticing. Implications for teacher education programs are included.

Keywords

Lesson study Professional noticing Prospective teacher education Field experience 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Support for this project was funded by the National Science Foundation Project #0732143. The ideas in this manuscript are solely generated by the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Science Foundation. We would like to thank the PI and Co-PIs on the grant, Enrique Galindo, Valarie Akerson, Meredith Park Rogers, and Anderson Norton III.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of IdahoCoeur d’AleneUSA
  2. 2.Metropolitan State University of DenverDenverUSA

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