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Learning to teach mathematics and to analyze teaching effectiveness: evidence from a video- and practice-based approach

Abstract

Although emerging consensus exists that practice-based approaches to teacher preparation assist in closing the distance between university coursework and fieldwork experiences and in assuring that future teachers learn to implement innovative research-based instructional strategies, little empirical research has investigated teacher learning from this approach. This study examines the impact of a video- and practice-based course on prospective teachers’ mathematics classroom practices and analysis of their own teaching. Two groups of elementary prospective teachers participated in the study—one attended the course and one did not. Findings reveal that the course assisted participants in making student thinking visible and in pursuing it further during instruction and in conducting evidence-based analyses of their own teaching. Conclusions discuss the importance of teaching these skills systematically during teacher preparation.

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Correspondence to Rossella Santagata.

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Santagata, R., Yeh, C. Learning to teach mathematics and to analyze teaching effectiveness: evidence from a video- and practice-based approach. J Math Teacher Educ 17, 491–514 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10857-013-9263-2

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Keywords

  • Teacher preparation
  • Mathematics
  • Video
  • Analysis
  • Reflection
  • Classroom teaching
  • Quasi experimental