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Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education

, Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 7–25 | Cite as

A primary teacher’s mathematics teaching: the development of beliefs and practice in different “supportive” contexts

  • Despina PotariEmail author
  • Barbara Georgiadou–Kabouridis
Article

Abstract

This article refers to a longitudinal case study of a primary school teacher over a period of 4 years. The focus is on the development of the teacher’s beliefs regarding mathematics teaching and learning from the last year of her university studies up to the third year of teaching mathematics in school. This development has been investigated within three different contexts, which have been distinguished in terms of the kind of support provided to this teacher. Two dominant beliefs emerged which have been traced through the period of the study from both the teacher’s reflections and actions. The first belief drew on the idea that what was considered an easy mathematical task by an adult could also be easily understood by children, while the second was that children learn mathematics through their actual involvement in a variety of teaching activities. The results indicate the way that teacher’s experiences from her university studies, actual classroom practice and inservice education interact and influence her beliefs and professional development.

Keywords

Mathematics teaching Professional support Teacher’s beliefs Teacher’s transition 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Despina Potari
    • 1
    Email author
  • Barbara Georgiadou–Kabouridis
    • 2
  1. 1.University of AthensAthensGreece
  2. 2.Ministry of EducationAthensGreece

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