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Peptide mass mapping in bioapatites isolated from animal bones

  • Biomaterials Synthesis and Characterization
  • Original Research
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Abstract

Bioapatite ceramics produced from biogenic sources provide highly attractive materials for the preparation of artificial replacements since such materials are not only more easily accepted by living organisms, but bioapatite isolated from biowaste such as xenogeneous bones also provides a low-cost material. Nevertheless, the presence of organic compounds in the bioapatite may lead to a deterioration in its quality and may trigger an undesirable immune response. Therefore, procedures which ensure the elimination of organic compounds through bioapatite isolation are being subjected to intense investigation and the presence of remaining organic impurities is being determined through the application of various methods. Since current conclusions concerning the conditions suitable for the elimination of organic compounds remain ambiguous, we used the mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach in order to determine the presence of proteins or peptides in bioapatite samples treated under the most frequently employed conditions, i.e., the alkaline hydrothermal process and calcination at 500 °C. Since we also investigated the presence of proteins or peptides in treated bioapatite particles of differing sizes, we discovered that both calcination and the size of the bioapatite particles constitute the main factors influencing the presence of proteins or peptides in bioapatite. In fact, while intact proteins were detected even in calcinated bioapatite consisting of particles >250 µm, no proteins were detected in the same material consisting of particles <40 µm. Therefore, we recommend the use of powdered bioapatite for the preparation of artificial replacements since it is more effectively purified than apatite in the form of blocks. In addition, we observed that while alkaline hydrothermal treatment leads to the non-specific cleavage of proteins, it does not ensure the full degradation thereof.

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Acknowledgements

We are grateful for the financial support provided for our work via a Ministry of Health of the Czech Republic grant project (NV15-25813A) and a Specific University research grant (MSMT No 20/2018), Czech Republic. We cordially thank Dr. Jiří Šantrůček and Ing. Lucie Maršálová at the Laboratory of Applied Proteomics of the University of Chemistry and Technology in Prague for providing the LC-ESI-Q-TOF MS data. Finally, special thanks go to Mr. Darren Ireland for the English language correction of the paper.

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Smrhova, T., Junkova, P., Kuckova, S. et al. Peptide mass mapping in bioapatites isolated from animal bones. J Mater Sci: Mater Med 31, 32 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10856-020-06371-z

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