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Integrin and chemokine receptor gene expression in implant-adherent cells during early osseointegration

Abstract

The mechanisms of early cellular recruitment and interaction to titanium implants are not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and adhesion markers during the first 24 h of implantation. Anodically oxidized and machined titanium implants were inserted in rat tibia. After 3, 12, and 24 h the implants were unscrewed and analyzed with quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Immunohistochemistry and scanning electron microscopy revealed different cell types, morphology and adhesion at the two implant surfaces. A greater amount of cells, as indicated by higher expression of small subunit ribosomal RNA (18S), was detected on the oxidized surface. Higher expression of CXC chemokine receptor-4 (at 12 h) and integrins, αv (at 12 h), β1 (at 24 h) and β2 (at 12 and 24 h) was detected at the oxidized surfaces. Significantly higher tumor necrosis factor-α (at 3 h) and interleukin-1β (at 24 h) expression was demonstrated for the machined surface. It is concluded that material surface properties rapidly modulate the expression of receptors important for the recruitment and adhesion of cells which are crucial for the inflammatory and regenerative processes at implant surfaces in vivo.

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Acknowledgements

The support from the Institute of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy (IBCT) (part of GöteborgBIO), the Swedish Research Council (grant K2009-52X-09495-22-3), Nobel Biocare AB, Göteborg, and Region Västra Götaland is gratefully acknowledged.

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Omar, O., Lennerås, M., Svensson, S. et al. Integrin and chemokine receptor gene expression in implant-adherent cells during early osseointegration. J Mater Sci: Mater Med 21, 969–980 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10856-009-3915-x

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10856-009-3915-x

Keywords

  • Integrin
  • Machine Surface
  • CXCR4 Expression
  • Integrin Expression
  • Titanium Implant