Journal of Insect Conservation

, Volume 20, Issue 3, pp 477–483

Inbreeding depression in monarch butterflies

  • Andrew J. Mongue
  • Michelle V. Tsai
  • Marta L. Wayne
  • Jacobus C. de Roode
ORIGINAL PAPER

DOI: 10.1007/s10841-016-9880-z

Cite this article as:
Mongue, A.J., Tsai, M.V., Wayne, M.L. et al. J Insect Conserv (2016) 20: 477. doi:10.1007/s10841-016-9880-z

Abstract

Monarch butterflies and their unique system of multigenerational migration have long fascinated the public, and concerns for the fate of this charismatic insect have grown due to the consistent declines in overwintering colony size over the last 20 years. Risks to this migratory insect have been considered in terms of climate change, habitat and thus population fragmentation, and decreased host plant availability. However, another obvious danger, that of decreased heterozygosity resulting from decreasing population size, has yet to be explored. Here we report experimental evidence for immediate inbreeding depression in individuals from the migratory population. Inbred matings produced less viable eggs and inbred offspring had higher developmental mortality and shorter lifespans. We discuss these results in the context of monarch migration extinction risk and suggest that additional genetic monitoring should be undertaken to protect this iconic animal.

Keywords

Population dynamics Migration Conservation planning Genetics 

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew J. Mongue
    • 1
    • 2
  • Michelle V. Tsai
    • 1
  • Marta L. Wayne
    • 3
  • Jacobus C. de Roode
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiologyEmory UniversityAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Ecology and Evolutionary BiologyUniversity of KansasLawrenceUSA
  3. 3.Department of BiologyUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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