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Journal of Family and Economic Issues

, Volume 29, Issue 3, pp 461–477 | Cite as

Job-Related Emotional Labor and Its Relationship to Work-Family Conflict and Facilitation

  • Brenda L. SeeryEmail author
  • Elizabeth A. Corrigall
  • Tammy Harpel
Original Paper

Abstract

This article used a differential salience demands-resources model to explore how self-focused (i.e., surface and deep acting) and other-focused (i.e., emotional enhancement and relationship management) job-related emotional labor are associated with bidirectional measures of work-family conflict and facilitation. Results indicated that surface acting was related positively with time-, strain-, and behavior-based work-family conflict and was associated negatively with work-to-family facilitation. Emotional enhancement was linked negatively to time-based work-to-family conflict and strain-based family-to-work conflict. Finally, relationship management was related negatively to both directions of behavior-based work-family conflict, but was associated positively with both directions of work-family enhancement. Results support the expansion of job-related emotional labor to include other- as well as self-focused aspects.

Keywords

Emotional labor Family-to-work conflict Family-to-work facilitation Work-to-family conflict Work-family facilitation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brenda L. Seery
    • 1
    Email author
  • Elizabeth A. Corrigall
    • 1
  • Tammy Harpel
    • 2
  1. 1.Pennsylvania State University Worthington ScrantonDunmoreUSA
  2. 2.Family and Child Studies, School of Human EcologyLouisiana Tech UniversityRustonUSA

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