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Journal of Family and Economic Issues

, Volume 27, Issue 2, pp 235–262 | Cite as

Effects of Spousal Economic and Cultural Factors on Dutch Marital Satisfaction

  • Ann Van den TroostEmail author
  • Ad A. Vermulst
  • Jan R.M. Gerris
  • Koen Matthijs
  • Jerry Welkenhuysen-Gybels
Article

ABSTRACT

Using panel data of Dutch first marriages with children (N Time 1=646, N Time 2=386), the relevance of economic and cultural factors in understanding marital satisfaction is examined. The sample was middle-aged and the average marital duration was 17 years (at Time 1). Besides, couples mainly represent single earner and main-earner households. Our results demonstrate that both economic and cultural factors are valid in understanding marital satisfaction. However, whereas cultural characteristics are more important explaining spousal marital satisfaction at Time 1, economic indicators are important predicting change in marital satisfaction. An interaction effect between cultural and economic factors was found as well. Husbands’ familialism moderates the effect of women’s employment on women’s marital satisfaction at Time 1.

Keywords

economic theory of marriage familialism female employment marital satisfaction sex role traditionalism 

Notes

Acknowledgment

The authors wish to thank the Fund for Scientific Research, Flanders (Belgium) for funding the project.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ann Van den Troost
    • 1
    Email author
  • Ad A. Vermulst
    • 2
  • Jan R.M. Gerris
    • 3
  • Koen Matthijs
    • 4
  • Jerry Welkenhuysen-Gybels
    • 5
  1. 1.Center for Population and Family Research, Department of SociologyCatholic University of LeuvenLeuvenBelgium
  2. 2.Institute of Family and Child Care StudiesRadboud University NijmegenNijmegenThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Institute of Family and Child Care StudiesRadboud University NijmegenNijmegenThe Netherlands
  4. 4.Center for Population and Family Research, Department of SociologyCatholic University of LeuvenLeuvenBelgium
  5. 5.Business & DecisionBrusselsBelgium

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