Skip to main content

Variation in reference assignment processes: psycholinguistic evidence from Germanic languages

Abstract

Referential dependencies for pronouns and reflexives can be established at different linguistic levels. According to the economy hierarchy of dependencies, syntactic dependencies are ‘cheaper’ than semantic dependencies, which are ‘cheaper’ than discourse dependencies. Psycholinguistic research on English and Dutch has shown that the interpretation of reflexives for which discourse operations are needed (i.e., in locative prepositional phrases) is computationally more costly than the interpretation of coargument reflexives that are based on syntactic dependencies only. Similarly, semantic bound variable interpretation has been shown to be less computationally demanding than discourse-based coreference interpretation. The current study investigates these dependencies in German and replicates the finding that semantic bound variable interpretation is cheaper than discourse-based coreference interpretation. In contrast and as predicted by theoretical accounts that postulate a close relationship of the verb and preposition in German that yields chain formation, no difference was found for the reflexives, supporting the idea that reflexives in prepositional phrases in German depend on the same interpretive mechanisms as coargument reflexives, indicating that the underlying syntactic configuration differs from that in other Germanic languages.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Fig. 1
Fig. 2

Notes

  1. But see Rooryck and Vanden Wyngaerd (2011) who discuss the difference in more detail and show that the picture is even more complex, depending on context ‘ziet zich’ may be acceptable. The literature agrees, however, on the fact that the two forms show different behavior and may lead to different interpretations.

  2. We use the label ‘coreference’ for the dependency between a pronoun and a definite description as in (i).

    1. (i)

      The athlete hopes that she will win.

    According to Reuland (2001) the pronoun is ambiguous between a bound variable reading and assignment of a value via discourse. Rule I (Grodzinsky and Reinhart 1993) proposes that bound variable interpretations are to be preferred, but crucially this implies that both dependencies are initially available. Rule I thus predicts that the coreference condition is more costly because in this condition two readings are available that need to be compared, a bound variable reading and a coreference reading, while no choice between two possible readings has to be made for the bound variable conditions. For our purposes it is crucial that a discourse-based coreference reading becomes available at all.

  3. Note that we are interested in similarity in structure (i.e., NP V reflexive vs. NP V NP P reflexive) and not in the difference between SE and SELF anaphors in this study. The reflexive in English was a SELF anaphor (himself/herself, which is the only reflexive available in English), whereas the Dutch study used a SE anaphor (zich). Following the discussion above, the German sich used here should correspond to a SELF anaphor.

  4. There is variation between predicates, since some predicates also have an inherently reflexive meaning or alternate with ditransitive structures. We took care of this by adding item as a random factor in the statistical analysis.

  5. Note that we created four versions of the material that varied in (i) order of presentation and (ii) combination of sentence and probe. We furthermore divided the material over two runs (sessions) per participant.

  6. Full (interaction) model: RT ~ Condition * Position + (1 + Condition | Participant) + (1 + Condition | Item) + (1 | Version) + (1 | Run).

    Main effects model: RT ~ Condition + Position + (1 + Condition | Participant) + (1 + Condition | Item) + (1 | Version) + (1 | Run)

    Zero model: RT ~ (1 + Condition | Participant) + (1 + Condition | Item) + (1 | Version) + (1 | Run)

  7. As one reviewer pointed out, comparing conditions with differences in sentence structure is tricky, since differences in processing costs can arise for reasons that are irrelevant to the manipulation that one is interested in. The design of this study could have been even more careful by including conditions in which there is no referential difference at the critical sentence position (by using a proper name instead of a pronominal) and that thus can function as a control for the observed pattern.

References

  • Abraham, Walter. 1995. Deutsche Syntax im Sprachvergleich: Grundlagen einer typologischen Syntax des Deutschen. Tübingen: Narr.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ackema, Peter, and Maaike Schoorlemmer. 1994. The middle construction and the syntax-semantics interface. Lingua 93(1): 59–90.

    Google Scholar 

  • Asudeh, Ash, and Frank Keller. 2001. Experimental evidence for a predication-based binding theory. In Papers from the 37th Meeting of the Chicago Linguistic Society, ed. Heidi Elston, Mary Andronis, Chris Ball, and Sylvain Neuvel, 1–14. Chicago: Chicago Linguistic Society.

    Google Scholar 

  • Baayen, R. H. 2008. Analyzing linguistic data: A practical introduction to statistics using R. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Badecker, William, and Kathleen Straub. 2002. The processing role of structural constraints on the interpretation of pronouns and anaphors. Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory, and Cognition 28(4): 748–769.

    Google Scholar 

  • Barbiers, Sjef, and Hans Bennis. 2003. Reflexives in Dutch dialects. In Germania et alia, ed. Jan Koster and Henk van Riemsdijk, 25–44. Groningen: Universiteit Groningen.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bates, Douglas, Martin Maechler, Ben Bolker, and Steve Walker. 2015. Fitting linear mixed-effects models using lme4. Journal of Statistical Software 67(1): 1–48. https://doi.org/10.18637/jss.v067.i01.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Burkhardt, Petra. 2005. The syntax-discourse interface. Representing and Iiterpreting dependency. Linguistik Aktuell/Linguistics today 80. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamin Publishers.

  • Burkhardt, Petra, Sergey Avrutin, Maria M. Piñango, and Esther Ruigendijk. 2008. Slower-than-normal syntactic processing in agrammatic Broca’s aphasia: Evidence from Dutch. Journal of Neurolinguistics 21(2): 120–137.

    Google Scholar 

  • Carminati, Maria N., Lyn Frazier, and Keith Rayner. 2002. Bound variables and C-command. Journal of Semantics 19(1): 1–34.

    Google Scholar 

  • Chien, Yu-Chin, and Kenneth Wexler. 1990. Children’s knowledge of locality conditions in binding as evidence for the modularity of syntax and pragmatics. Language Acquisition: A Journal of Developmental Linguistics 1(3): 225–295.

    Google Scholar 

  • Chomsky, Noam. 1981. Lectures on government and binding. Dordrecht: Foris.

    Google Scholar 

  • Chomsky, Noam. 1986. Knowledge of language: Its nature, origins, and use. New York: Praeger.

    Google Scholar 

  • Cunnings, Ian, and Patrick Sturt. 2014. Coargumenthood and the processing of reflexives. Journal of Memory and Language 75: 117–139.

    Google Scholar 

  • Cunnings, Ian, and Patrick Sturt. 2018. Coargumenthood and the processing of pronouns. Language, Cognition and Neuroscience 33 (10): 1235–1251. https://doi.org/10.1080/23273798.2018.1465188.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • De Vincenzi, Marica. 1996. Syntactic analysis in sentence comprehension: Effects of dependency types and grammatical constraints. Journal of Psycholinguistic Research 25(1): 117–133.

    Google Scholar 

  • Dienes, Zoltan. 2014. Using Bayes to get the most out of non-significant results. Frontiers in Psychology 5: 781.

    Google Scholar 

  • Everaert, Martin. 1986. The syntax of reflexivization. Dordrecht: Foris.

    Google Scholar 

  • Everaert, Martin. 2003. Reflexivanaphem und Reflexivdomänen. In Arbeiten zur Reflexivierung, ed. Lutz Gunkel, Gereon Müller, and Gisela Zifonun, 1–24. Tübingen: Niemeyer.

    Google Scholar 

  • Farmer, Ann K., and Robert M. Harnish. 1987. Communicative reference with pronouns. In The pragmatic perspective, ed. Marcella Bertuccelli-Papi and Jef Verschueren, 547–565. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

    Google Scholar 

  • Frazier, Lyn, and Charles Clifton. 2000. On bound variable interpretations: The LF-only hypothesis. Journal of Psycholinguistic Research 29(2): 125–139.

    Google Scholar 

  • Frick, Robert W. 1995. Accepting the null hypothesis. Memory and Cognition 23(1): 132–138.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gast, Volker, and Florian Haas. 2008. On reciprocal and reflexive uses of anaphors in German and other European languages. In Reciprocals and reflexives: Theoretical and typological explorations, ed. Ekkehard König and Volker Gast, 307. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.

    Google Scholar 

  • Grewendorf, Günther. 1989. Ergativity in German. Dordrecht: Foris.

    Google Scholar 

  • Grodzinsky, Yosef, and Tanya Reinhart. 1993. The innateness of binding and coreference. Linguistic Inquiry 24(1): 69–101.

    Google Scholar 

  • Grodzinsky, Yosef, Ken Wexler, Yuchin C. Chien, Susan Marakovitz, and Julie Solomon. 1993. The breakdown of binding relations. Brain and Language 45(3): 396–422.

    Google Scholar 

  • Haider, Hubert. 1992. Branching and discharge. Arbeitspapiere des SFB 340: 23.

    Google Scholar 

  • Harris, Tony, Ken Wexler, and Phillip J. Holcomb. 2000. An electrophysiological investigation of binding and coreference. Brain and Language 75: 313–346.

    Google Scholar 

  • Heim, Irene. 1998. Anaphora and semantic interpretation: A reinterpretation of Reinhart’s approach. In The interpretive tract, ed. Uli Sauerland and Orin Percus, 205–246. Cambridge, MA: MIT.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hendriks, Petra, John C.J. Hoeks, and Jennifer Spenader. 2015. Reflexive choice in Dutch and German. Journal of Comparative Germanic Linguistics 17: 229–252.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hestvik, Arild. 1991. Subjectless binding domains. Natural Language & Linguistic Theory 9(3): 455–496.

    Google Scholar 

  • Jackendoff, Ray. 1992. Mme. Tussaud meets the Binding Theory. Natural Language & Linguistic Theory 10(1): 1–31.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kaiser, Elsi, Jeffrey T. Runner, Rachel S. Sussman, and Michael K. Tanenhaus. 2009. Structural and semantic constraints on the resolution of pronouns and reflexives. Cognition 112(1): 55–80.

    Google Scholar 

  • Keenan, Edward L. 1971. Names, quantifiers, and the sloppy identity problem. Papers in Linguistics 4: 211–232.

    Google Scholar 

  • Keller, Frank, and Ash Asudeh. 2001. Constraints on linguistic coreference: structural vs. pragmatic factors. In Proceedings of the 23rd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society, eds. Johanne D. Moore and Keith Stenning, 483–488. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

  • Kiss, Tibor. 2001. Anaphora and Exemptness: A Comparative Treatment of Anaphoric Binding in German and English. In The Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Head-Driven Phrase Structure Grammar, eds. Dan Flickinger, and Andreas Kathol, 182–197. CSLI Publications.

  • Koornneef, Arnout W. 2008. Eye-catching anaphora, Ph.D. thesis, Utrecht University. Utrecht: LOT.

  • Koster, Jan, and Eric Reuland. 1991. Long distance anaphora. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • König, Ekkehard, and Peter Siemund. 1996. Emphatische Reflexiva und Fokusstruktur: Zur Syntax und Bedeutung von selbst. Sprache und Pragmatik 40: 1–42.

    Google Scholar 

  • Morey, Richard D., and Jeffrey N. Rouder. 2018. BayesFactor: Computation of Bayes Factors for common designs. R package version 0.9.12-4.2. https://CRAN.R-project.org/package=BayesFactor.

  • Motta, Giovanni, Francesco Rizzo, David Swinney, and Maria M. Pinango. 2000. Tempo: a software for psycholinguistic and neuroimaging testing. Brandeis University (Dept of Computer Science), University of California San Diego (Dept of Psychology) and Yale University (Department of Linguistics).

  • Neeleman, Ad, and Tanya Reinhart. 1998. Scrambling and the PF interface. In The projection of arguments, ed. Miriam Butt and W. Geuder, 309–353. Chicago: CSLI Publications.

    Google Scholar 

  • Nicol, Janet L., and David Swinney. 1989. The role of structure in coreference assignment during sentence comprehension. Journal of Psycholinguist Research 18(1): 5–19.

    Google Scholar 

  • Oya, Toshiaki. 2010. Three types of reflexive verbs in German. Linguistics 48(1): 227–257.

    Google Scholar 

  • Partee, Barbara. 1978. Bound variables and other anaphors. In Proceedings of the 1978 Workshop on Theoretical Issues in Natural Language Processing, 79–85. Urbana-Champaign: Association for Computational Linguistics.

  • Partee, Barbara, and Emmon Bach. 1981. Quantification, pronouns and VP anaphora. In Formal methods in the study of language, ed. Jeroen Groenendijk, Theo Janssen, and Martin Stokhof, 445–481. Amsterdam: Mathematisch Centrum.

    Google Scholar 

  • Pesetsky, David. 1987. Binding problems with experiencer verbs. Linguistic Inquiry 18(1): 126–140.

    Google Scholar 

  • Pesetsky, David. 2000. Phrasal movement and its kin. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Philip, William, and Peter Coopmans. 1996. The role of lexical feature acquisition in the development of pronominal anaphora. Amsterdam Series in Child Language Development 5(68): 73–106.

    Google Scholar 

  • Pica, Pierre. 1987. On the nature of the reflexivization cycle. In Proceedings of NELS 17, eds. Joyce McDonough, and Bernadette Plunkett, 483–499. Amherst, MA: GLSA, UMass/Amherst.

  • Piñango, Maria M., Petra Burkhardt, Dina Brun, and Sergey Avrutin. 2001. The psychological reality of the syntax-discourse interface: The case of pronominals. Utrecht: Utrecht University.

    Google Scholar 

  • Piñango, Maria M., Aaron Winnick, Rashad Ullah, and Edgar Zurif. 2006. Time-course of semantic composition: The case of aspectual coercion. Journal of Psycholinguistic Research 35(3): 233–244.

    Google Scholar 

  • Piñango, Maria M., Edgar Zurif, and Ray Jackendoff. 1999. Real-time processing implications of enriched composition at the syntax-semantics interface. Journal of Psycholinguistic Research 28(4): 395–414.

    Google Scholar 

  • Pollard, Carl, and Ivan A. Sag. 1992. Anaphors in English and the scope of binding theory. Linguistic Inquiry 23(2): 261–303.

    Google Scholar 

  • Postal, Paul M. 1971. Cross-over phenomena. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.

    Google Scholar 

  • Postma, Gertjan. 2004. Structurele tendensen in de opkomst van het reflexief pronomen ‘zich’ in het 15de-eeuwse Drenthe en de Theorie van Reflexiviteit. Nederlandse Taalkunde 9(2): 144–168.

    Google Scholar 

  • Psychology Software Tools, Inc. [E-Prime 2.0]. 2012. Retrieved from http://www.pstnet.com.

  • R Core Team. 2017. R: A language and environment for statistical computing. R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria. URL https://www.R-project.org/.

  • Reinhart, Tanya. 1983. Anaphora and semantic interpretation. London: Croom Helm.

    Google Scholar 

  • Reinhart, Tanya. 2000. Strategies of anaphora resolution. In Interface strategies, ed. Hans Bennis, Martin Everaert, and Eric Reuland, 295–324. North Holland Amsterdam: Royal Academy of Sciences.

    Google Scholar 

  • Reinhart, Tanya, and Eric Reuland. 1993. Reflexivity. Linguistic Inquiry 24(4): 657–720.

    Google Scholar 

  • Reinhart, Tanya, and Tal Siloni. 2005. The lexicon-syntax parameter: Reflexivization and other arity operations. Linguistic Inquiry 36(3): 389–436.

    Google Scholar 

  • Reis, Marga. 1982. Reflexivierung im Deutschen. In Actes du colloque du centre de recherches germaniques de l’universite de Nancy and journee annuelle des linguistes de l’association des germanistes de l’enseignement superieur, ed. E. Faucher, 1–40. Nancy.

  • Reuland, Eric. 2001. Primitives of binding. Linguistic Inquiry 32: 439–492.

    Google Scholar 

  • Reuland, Eric. 2011. Anaphora and language design. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Reuland, Eric, and Tanya Reinhart. 1995. Pronouns, anaphors and case. In Studies in comparative Germanic syntax, ed. Hubert Haider, Susan Olsen, and Sten Vikner, 241–268. Dordrecht: Kluwer.

    Google Scholar 

  • Roberts, Craige. 1989. Modal subordination and pronominal anaphora in discourse. Linguistics and Philosophy 12: 683–721.

    Google Scholar 

  • Rooryck, Johan, and Guido Vanden Wyngaerd. 2011. Dissolving binding theory. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Rouder, Jeffrey N., Paul L. Speckman, Dongchu Sun, Richard D. Morey, and Geoffrey Iverson. 2009. Bayesian t-tests for accepting and rejecting the null hypothesis. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review 16: 225–237.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ruigendijk, Esther. 2008. Pronoun interpretation in German Kindergarten children. Language Acquisition and Development Proceedings of GALA 2007, eds. Anna Gavarró and João Freitas. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

  • Ruigendijk, Esther, Naama Friedmann, Rama Novogrodsky, and Noga Balaban. 2010. Symmetry in comprehension and production of pronouns: A comparison of German and Hebrew. Lingua 120(8): 1991–2005.

    Google Scholar 

  • Runner, Jeffrey T., Rachel S. Sussman, and Michael K. Tanenhaus. 2002. Logophors in possessed picture noun phrases. In WCCFL 21 Proceedings, ed. Line Mikkelsen and Christopher Potts, 401–414. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Runner, Jeffrey T., Rachel S. Sussman, and Michael K. Tanenhaus. 2003. Assignment of reference to reflexives and pronouns in picture noun phrases: evidence from eye movements. Cognition 89(1): B1–B13.

    Google Scholar 

  • Runner, Jeffrey T., Rachel S. Sussman, and Michael K. Tanenhaus. 2006. Processing reflexives and pronouns in picture noun phrases. Cognitive Science 30(2): 193–241.

    Google Scholar 

  • Safir, Kenneth J. 2004. The syntax of anaphora. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Schumacher, Petra B., Jana Backhaus, and Manuel Dangl. 2015. Backward- and forward-looking potential of anaphors. Frontiers in Psychology 6: 1746.

    Google Scholar 

  • Schumacher, Petra B., and Yu-Chen Hung. 2012. Positional influences on information packaging: Insights from topological fields in German. Journal of Memory and Language 67(2): 295–310.

    Google Scholar 

  • Schumacher, Petra, Maria M. Piñango, Esther Ruigendijk, and Sergey Avrutin. 2010. Reference assignment in Dutch: Evidence for the syntax-discourse divide. Lingua 120(7): 1738–1763.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sells, Peter. 1987. Aspects of logophoricity. Linguistic Inquiry 18(3): 445–479.

    Google Scholar 

  • Shapiro, Lewis P. 2000. Some recent investigations of gap filling in normal listeners: Implications for normal and disordered language processing. In Language and the brain: representation and processing, ed. Yosef Grodzinsky, Lewis P. Shapiro, and David Swinney, 357–376. San Diego: Academic Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Shapiro, Lewis P., Bari Brookins, Betsy Gordon, and Nicholas Nagel. 1991. Verb effects during sentence processing. Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory, and Cognition 17(5): 983.

    Google Scholar 

  • Shapiro, Lewis P., and Beth A. Levine. 1990. Verb processing during sentence comprehension in aphasia. Brain and Language 38(1): 21–47.

    Google Scholar 

  • Shapiro, Lewis, Edgar Zurif, and Jane Grimshaw. 1987. Sentence processing and the mental representation of verbs. Cognition 27(3): 219–246.

    Google Scholar 

  • Shapiro, Lewis P., Edgar B. Zurif, and Jane Grimshaw. 1989. Verb processing during sentence comprehension: Contextual impenetrability. Journal of Psycholinguistic Research 18(2): 223–243.

    Google Scholar 

  • Siemund, Peter. 2003. Zur Analyse lokal ungebundener self-Formen im Englischen. In Arbeiten zur Reflexivierung, ed. Lutz Gunkel, Gereon Müller, and Gisela Zifonun, 219–237. Tübingen: Niemeyer.

    Google Scholar 

  • Steinbach, Markus. 1998. Middles in German. Dissertation. Humboldt Universität.

  • Steinbach, Markus. 2002. The ambiguity of weak reflexive pronouns in English and German. Studies in Comparative Germanic Syntax, eds. Jan Wouter Zwart and Werner Abraham, 323–348. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

  • van Berkum, Jos J.A., Colin M. Brown, and Peter Hagoort. 1999. Early referential context effects in sentence processing: Evidence from event-related brain potentials. Journal of Memory and Language 41(2): 147–182.

    Google Scholar 

  • Vasić, Nada, Sergey Avrutin, and Esther Ruigendijk. 2006. Interpretation of pronouns in VP-ellipsis constructions in Dutch Broca’s and Wernicke’s Aphasia. Brain and Language 96: 191–206.

    Google Scholar 

  • Warren, T. 2003. The processing complexity of quantifiers. In UMass Occasional Papers in Linguistics 27: On Semantic Processing, eds. L. Alonso-Ovalle, 211–237. Amherst, MA: GLSA, UMass/Amherst.

  • Williams, Edwin. 1997. Blocking and anaphora. Linguistic Inquiry 28(4): 577–628.

    Google Scholar 

  • Zuckerman, Shalom, Nada Vasić, and Sergey Avrutin. 2002. The syntax-discourse interface and the interpretation of pronominals by Dutch-speaking children. InProceedings of the 26th Annual Boston University Conference on Language Development, vol. 2, eds. Barbora Skarabela, Sarah Fish, and Anna H.J. Do, 781–792. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Press.

Download references

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank Hendrikje Ziemann and Julia Herbst who helped with data acquisition and data analysis.

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Esther Ruigendijk.

Additional information

Publisher's Note

Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

Appendix: German sentence material

Appendix: German sentence material

Coargument Reflexives versus PP reflexives

1. Coarg: Der Junge, der Geburtstag hatte, amüsierte sich, obwohl es gerade fürchterlich regnete.
  PP: Der Junge streute winzige Brotkrumen hinter sich, obwohl es gerade fürchterlich regnete.
  Probes: Straße/Bürger
2. Coarg: Die Apothekerin, die Musik hörte, setzte sich, bevor es an der Haustür klingelte.
  PP: Die Apothekerin setzte eine Puppe vor sich, bevor es an der Haustür klingelte.
  Probes: Museum/Anlage
3. Coarg: Die Assistentin, die spazieren ging, kratzte sich, weil viele Stechmücken herumschwirrten.
  PP: Die Assistentin spritzte viel Insektenspray um sich, weil viele Stechmücken herumschwirrten.
  Probes: Minute/Finale
4. Coarg: Der Verkäufer, der immerzu nervös war, versteckte sich, als Kundschaft in den Laden kam.
  PP: Der Verkäufer sammelte eben neue Ware vor sich, als Kundschaft in den Laden kam.
  Probes: Bezirk/Anteil
5. Coarg: Der Beamte, der am liebsten Sushi aß, rasierte sich, als der Dienst beendet war.
  PP: Der Beamte schmiss eine stumpfe Schere weit hinter sich, als der Dienst beendet war.
  Probes: Heimat/Besuch
6. Coarg: Der Tennisspieler, der dunkelblaue Shorts trug, verbarg sich, als die Scheinwerfer im Stadion angingen.
  PP: Der Tennisspieler schleuderte ein Handtuch weit hinter sich, als die Scheinwerfer im Stadion angingen.
  Probes: Fehler/Freude
7. Coarg: Die Mutter, die Karotten schnitt, verletzte sich, als das Telefon schrillte.
  PP: Die Mutter legte eine Gabel neben sich, als das Telefon schrillte.
  Probes: Antrag/Sommer
8. Coarg: Der Verteidiger, der Akten vertauscht hatte, verriet sich, als die Richterin den Saal betrat.
  PP: Der Verteidiger schob Akten und Beweismittel vor sich, als die Richterin den Saal betrat.
  Probes: Morgen/Spitze
9. Coarg: Die Verkäuferin, die wenig Englisch verstand, entrüstete sich, als ein Duzend Touristen den Laden betrat.
  PP: Die Verkäuferin sprühte exquisites Parfüm weit über sich, als ein Duzend Touristen den Laden betrat.
  Probes: Himmel/Nummer
10. Coarg: Der Einbrecher, der alles fallen ließ, verteidigte sich, als die Polizei eintraf.
  PP: Der Einbrecher lehnte eine Pergamentrolle hinter sich, als die Polizei eintraf.
  Probes: Gefühl/Körper
11. Coarg: Die Großmutter, die abends gerne töpferte, wusch sich, während ein schweres Gewitter übers Dorf zog.
  PP: Die Großmutter wickelte einen warmen Schal um sich, während ein schweres Gewitter übers Dorf zog.
  Probes: Papier/Reform
12. Coarg: Der Nachbar, der im Regen heimkam, entrüstete sich, weil die Fußballsendung ausfallen sollte.
  PP: Der Nachbar häufte die alten Zeitungen neben sich, weil die Fusballsendung ausfallen sollte.
  Probes: Klasse/Jugend
13. Coarg: Der Student, der gern Unfug trieb, verkleidete sich, bevor der Kindergeburtstag beginnen sollte.
  PP: Der Student goss aus Versehen Limo über sich, bevor der Kindergeburtstag beginnen sollte.
  Probes: Mittel/Leiter
14. Coarg: Der Schornsteinfeger, der über die Hauptstraße lief, schützte sich, als es fürchterlich zu hageln begann.
  PP: Der Schornsteinfeger schleppte Werkzeug und einen Eimer vor sich, als es fürchterlich zu hageln begann.
  Probes: Gebiet/Zimmer
15. Coarg: Die Lehrerin, die Faschingsumzüge liebte, maskierte sich, während die Schüler aus der Pause zurückkamen.
  PP: Die Lehrerin platzierte die Bastelutensilien vor sich, während die Schüler aus der Pause zurückkamen.
  Probes: Krise/Seele
16. Coarg: Die Braut, die unglaublich schwitzte, verschleierte sich, während die lange Autokolonne um die Ecke bog.
  PP: Die Braut befestigte ein Transparent hinter sich, während die lange Autokolonne um die Ecke bog.
  Probes: Basis/Roman
17. Coarg: Der Photograph, der früh eingetroffen war, versteckte sich, bevor die berühmte Schauspielerin auftauchte.
  PP: Der Photograph sammelte viele kleine Zettel vor sich, bevor die berühmte Schauspielerin auftauchte.
  Probes: Reise/Feuer
18. Coarg: Der Ingenieur, der Karotten schälte, schnitt sich, als die Gäste gleichzeitig eintrafen.
  PP: Der Ingenieur warf einen Korken hinter sich, als die Gäste gleichzeitig eintrafen.
  Probes: Wende/Sonne
19. Coarg: Die Pilotin, die äußerst kreativ war, malte sich, während eine Freundin das Essen zubereitete.
  PP: Die Pilotin kippte ein Glas Champagner über sich, während eine Freundin das Essen zubereitete.
  Probes: Blick/Suche
20. Coarg: Der Auszubildende, der Zigaretten rauchte, tarnte sich, als der Chef die Firma betrat.
  PP: Der Auszubildende stapelte große Holzkisten vor sich, als der Chef die Firma betrat.
  Probes: Linie/Runde
21. Coarg: Die Touristin, die verschlafen hatte, ärgerte sich, weil das Museum bald geschlossen werden sollte.
  PP: Die Touristin drängte einen Besucher hinter sich, weil das Museum bald geschlossen werden sollte.
  Probes: König/Osten
22. Coarg: Die Araberin, die Lippenstift trug, verhüllte sich, als ein Mann in den Wagen stieg.
  PP: Die Araberin schmiss die Einkaufstaschen hinter sich, als ein Mann in den Wagen stieg.
  Probes: Motto/Lager
23. Coarg: Der Anästhesist, der Fehler gemacht hatte, verachtete sich, als die Nachricht sich verbreitete.
  PP: Der Anästhesist schüttete das schmutzige Wasser hinter sich, als die Nachricht sich verbreitete.
  Probes: Alter/Natur
24. Coarg: Der Professor, der gern ausgiebig sprach, wiederholte sich, während mehrere Studenten zu spät kamen.
  PP: Der Professor lehnte große, schwere Bilder neben sich, während mehrere Studenten zu spät kamen.
  Probes: Programm/Sprecher

Light quantifier antecedents (BVL) versus restricted quantifier antecedents (BVR) versus coreference (COREF)

1. BVL: Jeder hofft ausdrücklich, dass er immer genug Obst kaufen kann, damit er gesund bleibt.
  BVR: Jeder Sportler hofft ausdrücklich, dass er immer genug Obst kaufen kann, damit er gesund bleibt.
  COREF: Der Sportler hofft ausdrücklich, dass er immer genug Obst kaufen kann, damit er gesund bleibt.
  Probes: Boden/Börse/Monat
2. BVL: Jeder möchte vor allem, dass er während der Arbeit abgesichert ist, damit er noch lange berufstätig bleibt.
  BVR: Jeder Polizist möchte vor allem, dass er während der Arbeit abgesichert ist, damit er noch lange berufstätig bleibt.
  COREF: Der Polizist möchte vor allem, dass er während der Arbeit abgesichert ist, damit er noch lange berufstätig bleibt.
  Probes: Gebäude/Energie/Anleger
3. BVL: Jeder hofft insgeheim, dass er einmal ein großes Haus besitzen wird, wenn er bereits viele Möbel angesammelt hat.
  BVR: Jeder Innenarchitekt hofft insgeheim, dass er einmal ein großes Haus besitzen wird, wenn er bereits viele Möbel angesammelt hat.
  COREF: Der Innenarchitekt hofft insgeheim, dass er einmal ein großes Haus besitzen wird, wenn er bereits viele Möbel angesammelt hat.
  Probes: Rolle/Hilfe/Seite
4. BVL: Jeder hofft zuversichtlich, dass er weiterhin viel Energie sparen kann, damit er die globale Erwärmung aufhalten kann.
  BVR: Jeder Ökologe hofft zuversichtlich, dass er weiterhin viel Energie sparen kann, damit er die globale Erwärmung aufhalten kann.
  COREF: Der Ökologe hofft zuversichtlich, dass er weiterhin viel Energie sparen kann, damit er die globale Erwärmung aufhalten kann.
  Probes: Professor/Regisseur/Grundlage
5. BVL: Jeder hofft sehnsuchtsvoll, dass er endlich einmal in die Südsee fliegen kann, damit er die Sonne genießen kann.
  BVR: Jeder Nordeuropäer hofft sehnsuchtsvoll, dass er endlich einmal in die Südsee fliegen kann, damit er die Sonne genießen kann.
  COREF: Der Nordeuropäer hofft sehnsuchtsvoll, dass er endlich einmal in die Südsee fliegen kann, damit er die Sonne genießen kann.
  Probes: Artikel/Ursache/Gelände
6. BVL: Jeder will unbedingt, dass er irgendwann eine Reise nach Norwegen gewinnt, weil er dann die Wale beobachten kann.
  BVR: Jeder Forscher will unbedingt, dass er irgendwann eine Reise nach Norwegen gewinnt, weil er dann die Wale beobachten kann.
  COREF: Der Forscher will unbedingt, dass er irgendwann eine Reise nach Norwegen gewinnt, weil er dann die Wale beobachten kann.
  Probes: Fraktion/Gemeinde/Republik
7. BVL: Jeder hofft inständig, dass er auch bei heißem Wetter genug Flüssigkeit hat, damit er den Körper abkühlen kann.
  BVR: Jeder Marathonläufer hofft inständig, dass er auch bei heißem Wetter genug Flüssigkeit hat, damit er den Körper abkühlen kann.
  COREF: Der Marathonläufer hofft inständig, dass er auch bei heißem Wetter genug Flüssigkeit hat, damit er den Körper abkühlen kann.
  Probes: Erfahrung/Forderung/Erklärung
8. BVL: Jeder hofft sehnsüchtig, dass er immer zu Weihnachten die erwarteten Geschenke bekommt, damit er sie nicht umtauschen muss.
  BVR: Jeder Ehemann hofft sehnsüchtig, dass er immer zu Weihnachten die erwarteten Geschenke bekommt, damit er sie nicht umtauschen muss.
  COREF: Der Ehemann hofft sehnsüchtig, dass er immer zu Weihnachten die erwarteten Geschenke bekommt, damit er sie nicht umtauschen muss.
  Probes: Woche/Frage/Thema
9. BVL: Jeder wünscht hoffnungsvoll, dass er beständig ein zuverlässiges Auto hat, damit er sicher verreisen kann.
  BVR: Jeder Familienvater wünscht hoffnungsvoll, dass er beständig ein zuverlässiges Auto hat, damit er sicher verreisen kann.
  COREF: Der Familienvater wünscht hoffnungsvoll, dass er beständig ein zuverlässiges Auto hat, damit er sicher verreisen kann.
  Probes: Kopf/Wort/Raum
10. BVL: Jeder hofft inständig, dass er schnellstmöglichst den neuen Reisepass bekommt, nachdem er ihn auf dem Amt beantragt hat.
  BVR: Jeder Tourist hofft inständig, dass er schnellstmöglichst den neuen Reisepass bekommt, nachdem er ihn auf dem Amt beantragt hat.
  COREF: Der Tourist hofft inständig, dass er schnellstmöglichst den neuen Reisepass bekommt, nachdem er ihn auf dem Amt beantragt hat.
  Probes: Bahn/Text/Kurs
11. BVL: Jeder hofft darauf, dass er weiterhin im Winter Urlaub bekommt, wenn er gerne in den Alpen Ski fährt.
  BVR: Jeder Wintersportler hofft darauf, dass er weiterhin im Winter Urlaub bekommt, wenn er gerne in den Alpen Ski fährt.
  COREF: Der Wintersportler hofft darauf, dass er weiterhin im Winter Urlaub bekommt, wenn er gerne in den Alpen Ski fährt.
  Probes: Familie/Angebot/Februar
12. BVL: Jeder hofft sehnlichst, dass er endlich einmal im Lotto gewinnt, damit er zum Beispiel das Traumhaus in der Karibik kaufen kann.
  BVR: Jeder Rentner hofft sehnlichst, dass er endlich einmal im Lotto gewinnt, damit er zum Beispiel das Traumhaus in der Karibik kaufen kann.
  COREF: Der Rentner hofft sehnlichst, dass er endlich einmal im Lotto gewinnt, damit er zum Beispiel das Traumhaus in der Karibik kaufen kann.
  Probes: Vorjahr/Auftrag/Versuch
13. BVL: Jeder wünscht angespannt, dass er doch noch die Flugabfertigung rechtzeitig erreicht, damit er noch an Bord gehen kann.
  BVR: Jeder Reisende wünscht angespannt, dass er doch noch die Flugabfertigung rechtzeitig erreicht, damit er noch an Bord gehen kann.
  COREF: Der Reisende wünscht angespannt, dass er doch noch die Flugabfertigung rechtzeitig erreicht, damit er noch an Bord gehen kann.
  Probes: Polen/Täter/Autor
14. BVL: Jeder hofft darauf, dass er wenn nötig die erhöhten Mieten auch in Zukunft zahlen kann, damit er nicht auf der Strasse landet.
  BVR: Jeder Student hofft darauf, dass er wenn nötig die erhöhten Mieten auch in Zukunft zahlen kann, damit er nicht auf der Strasse landet.
  COREF: Der Student hofft darauf, dass er wenn nötig die erhöhten Mieten auch in Zukunft zahlen kann, damit er nicht auf der Strasse landet.
  Probes: Punkt/Tisch/Kraft
15. BVL: Jeder wünscht hoffnungsvoll, dass er noch mehr Straßencafes entdeckt, damit er im Sommer viel Eis essen kann.
  BVR: Jeder Italiener wünscht hoffnungsvoll, dass er noch mehr Straßencafes entdeckt, damit er im Sommer viel Eis essen kann.
  COREF: Der Italiener wünscht hoffnungsvoll, dass er noch mehr Straßencafes entdeckt, damit er im Sommer viel Eis essen kann.
  Probes: Zweifel/Betrieb/Antwort
16. BVL: Jeder hofft darauf, dass er noch einen Freund in den neuen Kinofilm einladen kann, damit er nicht alleine gehen muss.
  BVR: Jeder Jugendliche hofft darauf, dass er noch einen Freund in den neuen Kinofilm einladen kann, damit er nicht alleine gehen muss.
  COREF: Der Jugendliche hofft darauf, dass er noch einen Freund in den neuen Kinofilm einladen kann, damit er nicht alleine gehen muss.
  Probes: Hand/Wahl/Bild
17. BVL: Jeder hofft nachdrücklich, dass er bald in den Zoo gehen kann, damit er die neuen Pantherkinder sehen kann.
  BVR: Jeder Junge hofft nachdrücklich, dass er bald in den Zoo gehen kann, damit er die neuen Pantherkinder sehen kann.
  COREF: Der Junge hofft nachdrücklich, dass er bald in den Zoo gehen kann, damit er die neuen Pantherkinder sehen kann.
  Probes: Trainer/Problem/Gericht
18. BVL: Jeder wünscht sehnsüchtig, dass er demnächst für die Wohnungsrenovierung nicht zu viel zahlen muss, damit er noch Geld für Möbel übrig hat.
  BVR: Jeder neue Mieter wünscht sehnsüchtig, dass er demnächst für die Wohnungsrenovierung nicht zu viel zahlen muss, damit er noch Geld für Möbel übrig hat.
  COREF: Der neue Mieter wünscht sehnsüchtig, dass er demnächst für die Wohnungsrenovierung nicht zu viel zahlen muss, damit er noch Geld für Möbel übrig hat.
  Probes: Umsatz/Beginn/Kirche
19. BVL: Jeder hofft inständig, dass er umgehend die richtige Partnerin finden wird, damit er endlich eine Familie gründen kann.
  BVR: Jeder Junggeselle hofft inständig, dass er umgehend die richtige Partnerin finden wird, damit er endlich eine Familie gründen kann.
  COREF: Der Junggeselle hofft inständig, dass er umgehend die richtige Partnerin finden wird, damit er endlich eine Familie gründen kann.
  Probes: Westen/Grenze/System
20. BVL: Jeder wünscht erwartungsvoll, dass er unerwartet die Aufgabe richtig gelöst hat, damit er am Ende den Gewinn ausgezahlt bekommt.
  BVR: Jeder Teilnehmer wünscht erwartungsvoll, dass er unerwartet die Aufgabe richtig gelöst hat, damit er am Ende den Gewinn ausgezahlt bekommt.
  COREF: Der Teilnehmer wünscht erwartungsvoll, dass er unerwartet die Aufgabe richtig gelöst hat, damit er am Ende den Gewinn ausgezahlt bekommt.
  Probes: Titel/Sache/Reihe
21. BVL: Jeder wünscht hauptsächlich, dass er noch einmal in den Zoo gehen kann, damit er das Eisbärjunge von Nahem sehen kann.
  BVR: Jeder Besucher wünscht hauptsächlich, dass er noch einmal in den Zoo gehen kann, damit er das Eisbärjunge von Nahem sehen kann.
  COREF: Der Besucher wünscht hauptsächlich, dass er noch einmal in den Zoo gehen kann, damit er das Eisbärjunge von Nahem sehen kann.
  Probes: Beratung/Änderung/Regelung
22. BVL: Jeder glaubt inständig, dass er wenn nötig den Feind übermannen kann, damit er nicht erst auf Hilfe warten muss.
  BVR: Jeder Spion glaubt inständig, dass er wenn nötig den Feind übermannen kann, damit er nicht erst auf Hilfe warten muss.
  COREF: Der Spion glaubt inständig, dass er wenn nötig den Feind übermannen kann, damit er nicht erst auf Hilfe warten muss.
  Probes: Nachfrage/Kontrolle/Gegenteil
23. BVL: Jeder bestätigt sofort, dass er den Film verstanden hat, wenn er dem Regisseur begegnet.
  BVR: Jeder Zuschauer bestätigt sofort, dass er den Film verstanden hat, wenn er dem Regisseur begegnet.
  COREF: Der Zuschauer bestätigt sofort, dass er den Film verstanden hat, wenn er dem Regisseur begegnet.
  Probes: Gang/Feld/Stil
24. BVL: Jeder behauptet felsenfest, dass er tatsächlich den Angeklagten gesehen hat, damit er den Gerichtssaal endlich verlassen darf.
  BVR: Jeder Zeuge behauptet felsenfest, dass er tatsächlich den Angeklagten gesehen hat, damit er den Gerichtssaal endlich verlassen darf.
  COREF: Der Zeuge behauptet felsenfest, dass er tatsächlich den Angeklagten gesehen hat, damit er den Gerichtssaal endlich verlassen darf.
  Probes: Behandlung/Auffassung/Erinnerung
25. BVL: Jeder meint nachdrücklich, dass er höchstens sehr selten krank sei, damit er seine Stelle nicht verliert.
  BVR: Jeder Angestellte meint nachdrücklich, dass er höchstens sehr selten krank sei, damit er seine Stelle nicht verliert.
  COREF: Der Angestellte meint nachdrücklich, dass er höchstens sehr selten krank sei, damit er seine Stelle nicht verliert.
  Probes: Auswahl/Pfenning/Prinzip
26. BVL: Jeder hofft sicherlich, dass er gestern nicht geblitzt wurde, damit er seinen Führerschein nicht verliert.
  BVR: Jeder Autofahrer hofft sicherlich, dass er gestern nicht geblitzt wurde, damit er seinen Führerschein nicht verliert.
  COREF: Der Autofahrer hofft sicherlich, dass er gestern nicht geblitzt wurde, damit er seinen Führerschein nicht verliert.
  Probes: Bedarf/Anzahl/Praxis
27. BVL: Jeder erwartet zuversichtlich, dass er wahrscheinlich das Buch spannend findet, damit er gut unterhalten wird.
  BVR: Jeder Leser erwartet zuversichtlich, dass er wahrscheinlich das Buch spannend findet, damit er gut unterhalten wird.
  COREF: Der Leser erwartet zuversichtlich, dass er wahrscheinlich das Buch spannend findet, damit er gut unterhalten wird.
  Probes: Pflege/Objekt/Export
28. BVL: Jeder hofft inständig, dass er nachts gut sichtbar ist, damit er nicht von einem Auto angefahren wird.
  BVR: Jeder Radfahrer hofft inständig, dass er nachts gut sichtbar ist, damit er nicht von einem Auto angefahren wird.
  COREF: Der Radfahrer hofft inständig, dass er nachts gut sichtbar ist, damit er nicht von einem Auto angefahren wird.
  Probes: Vorgang/Meldung/Ausland
29. BVL: Jeder möchte offensichtlich, dass er sofort die neuen Geräte gleich anschließen kann, damit er sie ausprobieren kann.
  BVR: Jeder Installateur möchte offensichtlich, dass er sofort die neuen Geräte gleich anschließen kann, damit er sie ausprobieren kann.
  COREF: Der Installateur möchte offensichtlich, dass er sofort die neuen Geräte gleich anschließen kann, damit er sie ausprobieren kann.
  Probes: Statuts/Ablauf/Steuer
30. BVL: Jeder hofft inständig, dass er demnächst Erfolg hat, damit er sich um seine Existenz nicht weiter sorgen muss.
  BVR: Jeder Dichter hofft inständig, dass er demnächst Erfolg hat, damit er sich um seine Existenz nicht weiter sorgen muss.
  COREF: Der Dichter hofft inständig, dass er demnächst Erfolg hat, damit er sich um seine Existenz nicht weiter sorgen muss.
  Probes: Tabelle/Anzeige/Bestand
31. BVL: Jeder übt unerschütterlich, dass er umgehend die Prüfung beim erstem Mal besteht, damit er viel Geld sparen kann.
  BVR: Jeder Anfänger übt unerschütterlich, dass er umgehend die Prüfung beim erstem Mal besteht, damit er viel Geld sparen kann.
  COREF: Der Anfänger übt unerschütterlich, dass er umgehend die Prüfung beim erstem Mal besteht, damit er viel Geld sparen kann.
  Probes: Martkanteil/Bezeichnung/Gemeinderat
32. BVL: Jeder hofft offensichtlich, dass er äußerst begehrenswert ist, damit er beim Objekt seiner Begierde Erfolg habe.
  BVR: Jeder Verehrer hofft offensichtlich, dass er äußerst begehrenswert ist, damit er beim Objekt seiner Begierde Erfolg habe.
  COREF: Der Verehrer hofft offensichtlich, dass er äußerst begehrenswert ist, damit er beim Objekt seiner Begierde Erfolg habe.
  Probes: Hinsicht/Handlung/Standard

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Ruigendijk, E., Schumacher, P.B. Variation in reference assignment processes: psycholinguistic evidence from Germanic languages. J Comp German Linguistics 23, 39–76 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10828-019-09112-x

Download citation

  • Received:

  • Accepted:

  • Published:

  • Issue Date:

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10828-019-09112-x

Keywords

  • Reflexivity
  • Bound variables
  • German
  • Language comprehension