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Parental Gratitude and Adolescent Anomie and Hope

Abstract

Objectives

The contribution of parental gratitude to the adolescent’s hope is plausible in light of social integration theory but empirically unverified. According to the theory, parental gratitude facilitates an integrative social environment for the adolescent to sustain hope. The theory also suggests that the adolescent’s anomie or normlessness, as a negative indicator of social integration, is a mediator of the contribution.

Methods

To verify the contributions, the present study surveyed 310 pairs of Hong Kong Chinese adolescents and their parents. In each of the pairs, the adolescent reported his or her hope and anomie, whereas the parent reported his or her gratitude.

Results

Supporting the theory, results demonstrated the contribution of parental gratitude to adolescent hope through mediation by adolescent anomie. Specifically, parental gratitude showed a negative effect on adolescent hope, which in turn displayed a negative effect on adolescent hope.

Conclusions

The results imply the value of promoting parental gratitude particularly and social integration generally for sustaining adolescent hope.

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Fig. 1

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Acknowledgements

The paper evolves from a research grant provided by the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, City University of Hong Kong (3-2-201404)

Author Contributions

The first author handles the theory and the second author handles data collection.

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Correspondence to Chau-kiu Cheung.

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All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee of the City University of Hong Kong and with the 1964 Helsinki Declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

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Cheung, Ck., Yeung, J.W.K. Parental Gratitude and Adolescent Anomie and Hope. J Child Fam Stud 29, 738–746 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10826-019-01562-x

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Keywords

  • Hope
  • Gratitude
  • Anomie
  • Social integration