Journal of Child and Family Studies

, Volume 26, Issue 7, pp 1923–1935

Caregiver perceptions of Parent Peer Support Services within the Wraparound Service Delivery Model

  • Geetha Gopalan
  • Maria Jose Horen
  • Eric Bruns
  • Miera Corey
  • Sarah Meteyer
  • Morgan Pardue
  • Tynetta Lane
  • Marlene Matarese
Original Paper
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Abstract

This qualitative study examined caregivers’ perceptions of Parent Peer Support (PPS) services, embedded in the Wraparound service delivery model for youth with severe emotional and behavioral disturbances (SEBD), to identify potential engagement facilitators and barriers. Wraparound is a holistic process involving multiple formal and informal providers to collectively implement an individualized, family-centered plan of care focused on maintaining youth with SEBD within the community. PPS are frequently referred to caregivers involved in Wraparound to provide additional support. Caregivers (n = 35) previously involved in an evaluation of one state’s Wraparound model participated in a single 30–60-min interview. Interview questions examined caregivers’ expectations about PPS, reasons for accepting or refusing PPS, and caregivers’ perceived impact of PPS. Transcribed interviews were analyzed using strategies from grounded theory methodology. Perceived need, as well as desire for shared experiences, knowledge, and assistance in accessing resources, facilitated accepting the PPS service. Barriers included inaccurate expectations of PPS, time limitations on Wraparound services, escalating youth behavior requiring more restrictive placements, scheduling difficulties, perceived unresponsiveness, and caregivers feeling overwhelmed by the number of providers. Caregivers indicated that PPS provided several benefits for themselves, youth in the care, and their families. However, potential barriers to ongoing engagement included perceived intrusiveness, as well as misalignment between services offered and caregivers’ needs.

Keywords

Parent peer support Wraparound Engagement Perceived impact Youth Severe emotional and behavioral disturbances 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Geetha Gopalan
    • 1
  • Maria Jose Horen
    • 2
  • Eric Bruns
    • 3
  • Miera Corey
    • 2
  • Sarah Meteyer
    • 2
  • Morgan Pardue
    • 2
  • Tynetta Lane
    • 2
  • Marlene Matarese
    • 2
  1. 1.University of Maryland School of Social WorkBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.The Institute for Innovation and ImplementationUniversity of Maryland School of Social WorkBaltimoreUSA
  3. 3.University of Washington School of MedicineSeattleUSA

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