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Development and Psychometric Properties of the Self-Representation Questionnaire for Adolescents (SRQA)

Abstract

Given the lack of validated measures of adolescents’ self-representation, in this paper we present the development process and psychometric properties of a new self-representation questionnaire for adolescents (SRQA), aged 12–16 year old. We examined SRQA factor structure through two studies. In the first study, 32 attributes (16 positive and 16 negative), previously validated in three studies, were administered to 239 adolescents (M = 13.8; SD = 1.28). An exploratory factor analysis showed that 21 attributes (13 positive and 8 negative) were organized in five factors: instrumental, social, emotional, intelligence, and physical appearance. In the second study, these 21 attributes were administered to 232 adolescents (M = 13.8; SD = 1.23). A confirmatory factor analysis supported the SRQA five factor model (Model fit: χ 2/df ratio = 2.392; CFI = .90; RMSEA = .08). Internal consistency was acceptable, ranging between .60 and .85. Girls displayed higher scores in the instrumental and social factors, whereas boys presented higher scores on the physical appearance factor. In line with previous research, results regarding age differences were inconsistent: while in Study 1 results suggested that as, age increases, adolescents’ intelligence self-representation becomes more negative, in Study 2 no age differences were found. Concurrent validity of the SRQA was explored through correlations with the Teacher Report Form, filled out by the adolescents’ homeroom teachers. Results revealed significant negative correlations between two dimensions of self-representation (i.e., instrumental and intelligence) and several dimensions of adolescents’ internalizing and externalizing problems, providing evidence of concurrent validity for the SRQA.

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Acknowledgments

This research was supported by Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology Doctoral Grants SFRH/BD/21507/2005 and SFRH/BD/90354/2012, awarded respectively to Ana Martins and Carla Sofia Silva. We thank the schools for approving this study and are grateful to the adolescents and homeroom teachers for agreeing to participate.

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Silva, C.S., Martins, A.C. & Calheiros, M.M. Development and Psychometric Properties of the Self-Representation Questionnaire for Adolescents (SRQA). J Child Fam Stud 25, 2718–2732 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10826-016-0438-1

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Keywords

  • Self-representation
  • Adolescents
  • Psychosocial functioning
  • Factor analysis
  • Psychometrics