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Acceptability and Feasibility of Peer Assisted Supervision and Support for Intervention Practitioners: A Q-methodology Evaluation

Abstract

Evidence-based interventions often include quality improvement methods to support fidelity and improve client outcomes. Clinical supervision is promoted as an effective way of developing practitioner confidence and competence in delivery; however, supervision is often inconsistent and embedded in hierarchical line management structures that may limit the opportunity for reflective learning. The Peer Assisted Supervision and Support (PASS) supervision model uses peer relationships to promote the self-regulatory capacity of practitioners to improve intervention delivery. The aim of the present study was to assess the acceptability and feasibility of PASS amongst parenting intervention practitioners. A Q-methodology approach was used to generate data and 30 practitioners volunteered to participate in the study. Data were analyzed and interpreted using standard Q-methodology procedures and by-person factor analysis yielded three factors. There was consensus that PASS was acceptable. Participants shared the view that PASS facilitated an environment of support where negative aspects of interpersonal relationships that might develop in supervision were not evident. Two factors represented the viewpoint that PASS was also a feasible model of supervision. However, the third factor was comprised of practitioners who reported that PASS could be time consuming and difficult to fit into existing work demands. There were differences across the three factors in the extent to which practitioners considered PASS impacted on their intervention delivery. The findings highlight the importance of organizational mechanisms that support practitioner engagement in supervision.

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Acknowledgments

This project was funded by NHS Education Scotland and we would particularly like to thank Beatrice Carroll and Elaine Ogilvie from the Psychology of Parenting Project for their help with the development of the data collection materials and facilitating the collection of the data. We also thank Professor Rachel Baker for her guidance on Q-methodology throughout.

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Correspondence to Kerri E. McPherson.

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Conflict of interest

The Triple P-Positive Parenting Program is owned by The University of Queensland. The University, through its technology transfer company Uniquest Pty Ltd, has licensed Triple P International Pty Ltd to disseminate the program worldwide. Royalties stemming from this dissemination work are paid to UniQuest, which distributes payments to the University of Queensland Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences, School of Psychology, Parenting and Family Support Centre, and contributory authors in accordance with the University’s intellectual property policy. No author has any share or ownership in Triple P International. Matthew Sanders is the founder and lead author of the Triple P-Positive Parenting Program, and is a consultant to Triple P International. All other authors declare they have no conflict of interest. This study was funded by NHS Education Scotland.

Research Involving Human Participants

All procedures performed in this study involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of, and approved by, Glasgow Caledonian University School of Health and Life Sciences Ethics Committee and were in accordance with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individuals participants included in the study.

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McPherson, K.E., Sanders, M.R., Schroeter, B. et al. Acceptability and Feasibility of Peer Assisted Supervision and Support for Intervention Practitioners: A Q-methodology Evaluation. J Child Fam Stud 25, 720–732 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10826-015-0281-9

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10826-015-0281-9

Keywords

  • Q-methodology
  • Supervision
  • Parenting interventions
  • Evaluation
  • Program implementation