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Journal of Child and Family Studies

, Volume 14, Issue 4, pp 551–575 | Cite as

Outcomes for Children and Adolescents After Residential Treatment: A Review of Research from 1993 to 2003

  • Heather J. HairEmail author
Article

Abstract

The focus of this research review is to determine what factors increase the likelihood that positive individual and systemic changes occur for children and adolescents following discharge from residential treatment. Residential treatment outcome studies from 1993 to 2003 that fulfilled predetermined criteria were located through 4 on-line databases using key word combinations. The research selected was: (a) 7 studies that measured outcome immediately upon completion of treatment and discharge, and (b) 11 studies where outcome progress was assessed at one or more follow-up dates after discharge. Results showed that children and adolescents with severe emotional and behaviour disorders can benefit and sustain positive outcomes from residential treatment that is multi-modal, holistic and ecological in its approach. Similar to the clinical child psychotherapy research, conclusions must be tempered due to the limited number of studies and methodological weaknesses. Future considerations highlight how research results can more realistically reflect intervention effectiveness when elements of the ecological and systemic landscape of care are addressed.

Key Words

residential treatment outcome research children and adolescents mental health youth in care 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Social WorkWilfrid Laurier UniversityWaterlooCanada

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