Feminist Ecological Economics and Sustainability

Synopsis

New developments in feminist ecological economics and ecofeminist economics are contributing to the search for theories and policy approaches to move economies toward sustainability. This paper summarizes work by ecofeminists and feminist ecological economists which is relevant to the sustainability challenge and its implications for the discipline of economics. Both democracy and lower material throughputs are generally seen as basic principles of economic sustainability. Feminist theorists and feminist ecological economists offer many important insights into the conundrum of how to make a democratic and equity-enhancing transition to an economy based on less material throughput. These flow from feminist research on unpaid work and caring labor, provisioning, development, valuation, social reproduction, non-monetized exchange relationships, local economies, redistribution, citizenship, equity-enhancing political institutions, and labor time, as well as creative modeling approaches and activism-based theorizing.

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Correspondence to Patricia E. Perkins.

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Perkins, P.E. Feminist Ecological Economics and Sustainability. J Bioecon 9, 227–244 (2007). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10818-007-9028-z

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Keywords

  • feminist economics
  • ecological economics
  • sustainable development
  • unpaid work
  • economic valuation
  • caring labor
  • material throughput
  • economic growth
  • gender
  • equity
  • social reproduction
  • local economies
  • social change
  • sustaining services
  • social sustainability
  • feminism
  • provisioning
  • sustainable livelihoods
  • service sector
  • quality of life
  • work time
  • multi-tasking
  • discourse-based valuation
  • community economies
  • social resilience

JEL Classification

  • B54
  • D10
  • D13
  • D19
  • D46
  • D62
  • D63
  • D64
  • E26
  • F01
  • J16
  • Q56
  • Q57