Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory

, Volume 23, Issue 2, pp 427–447 | Cite as

Beyond Replication: the Quantification of Route Models in the North Jazira, Iraq

Article

Abstract

The primary aim of this paper is to present a solution to the issue of the statistical validation of route models. In addition, it introduces a body of theory taken from the broader field of route studies, isolates individual physical variables commonly used to predict route locations and quantifies them against the preserved hollow ways in the North Jazira Survey area, ending with a discussion of the complexity of human travel and the paramount importance of cultural variables.

Keywords

GIS Route analysis Quantification Mesopotamia North Jazira 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of ArchaeologyDurham UniversityDurhamUK

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