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Landscape, Experience and GIS: Exploring the Potential for Methodological Dialogue

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Rennell, R. Landscape, Experience and GIS: Exploring the Potential for Methodological Dialogue. J Archaeol Method Theory 19, 510–525 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10816-012-9144-5

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Keywords

  • Landscape
  • GIS
  • Phenomenology
  • Iron Age
  • Experience