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Another Dating Revolution for Prehistoric Archaeology?

  • Grant W. G. Cochrane
  • Trudy Doelman
  • Lyn Wadley
Article

Abstract

Transitions to the Howiesons Poort Industry and other early modern human cultural phases have conventionally been explained as direct or indirect responses to major climatic and ecological fluctuations. Advances in optically stimulated luminescence dating have now provided the time resolution necessary to refute these explanations. However, for improvements in dating methods to have a revolutionary impact on the archaeology of early modern human evolution, the correction of these flawed narratives can only be regarded as a first step. What is more important is that the discipline now embraces the opportunity to analyse cultural entities in terms of their internal temporal structure, and hence to realign praxis with contemporary evolutionary theory.

Keywords

OSL dating Howiesons Poort Cultural evolution Temporal resolution 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We gratefully acknowledge the helpful information and advice provided to us by Bert Roberts and Guillaume Porraz during the production of this paper. We also thank Mark Moore, Simon Holdaway, Peter Hiscock and three anonymous referees for providing comments on earlier drafts of the manuscript.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Grant W. G. Cochrane
    • 1
    • 2
  • Trudy Doelman
    • 2
  • Lyn Wadley
    • 3
  1. 1.Cutting Edge ArchaeologyMooloolabaAustralia
  2. 2.Department of ArchaeologyUniversity of SydneySydneyAustralia
  3. 3.School of Geography, Archaeology and Environmental Studies and Institute for Human EvolutionUniversity of the WitwatersrandJohannesburgSouth Africa

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