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Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics

, Volume 35, Issue 3, pp 425–429 | Cite as

Disparities in reproductive outcomes according to the endometrial preparation protocol in frozen embryo transfer

The risk of early pregnancy loss in frozen embryo transfer cycles
  • I. Hatoum
  • L. Bellon
  • N. Swierkowski
  • M. Ouazana
  • S. Bouba
  • K. Fathallah
  • B. Paillusson
  • M. Bailly
  • F. Boitrelle
  • L. Alter
  • M. Bergère
  • J. Selva
  • R. Wainer
Assisted Reproduction Technologies

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of stimulated and artificial endometrial preparation protocols on reproductive outcomes in frozen embryo transfer (FET) cycles.

Methods

We performed a retrospective study of 1926 FET cycles over a 3.5-year period in the Fertility Unit at a University Hospital. Stimulated and artificial protocols were used for endometrial preparation. The embryos for FET were obtained from either in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles. Live birth rate and early pregnancy loss rates were retrospectively compared.

In artificial protocols, oral or vaginal administration of oestradiol 2 mg two or three times a day was followed by vaginal supplementation with progesterone 200 mg two or three times a day. In stimulated protocols, recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone was administered from day 4 onward. Vaginal ultrasound was used for endometrial and ovarian monitoring. A pregnancy test was performed 14 days after FET. If it was positive, oestradiol and progesterone were administered up until the 12th week of gestation in artificial cycles. We defined early pregnancy losses as biochemical pregnancies (preclinical losses) and miscarriages.

Results

Data on 865 artificial cycles (45% of the total) and 1061 stimulated cycles (55%) were collected. Early pregnancy loss rate was significantly lower for stimulated cycles (34.2%) than for artificial cycles (56.9%), and the live birth rate was significantly higher for stimulated cycles (59.7%) than for artificial cycles (29.1%).

Conclusion

In frozen embryo transfer, artificial cycles were associated with more early pregnancy loss and lower live birth rate than stimulated cycles.

Keywords

Frozen embryo transfer Reproductive outcomes Endometrial preparation 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

The study was approved by Institutional Review Board, and the study data completely excluded the identification of subjects.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. Hatoum
    • 1
  • L. Bellon
    • 1
  • N. Swierkowski
    • 1
  • M. Ouazana
    • 1
  • S. Bouba
    • 1
  • K. Fathallah
    • 1
  • B. Paillusson
    • 1
  • M. Bailly
    • 1
  • F. Boitrelle
    • 1
    • 2
  • L. Alter
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Bergère
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. Selva
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • R. Wainer
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Fertility UnitPoissy-Saint-Germain-en-Laye General HospitalPoissyFrance
  2. 2.EA7404 “Gametes, Implantation, Gestation” Research UnitUniversity of Versailles Saint Quentin en Yvelines - Paris SaclayMontigny-le-BretonneuxFrance
  3. 3.Institut de Recherche en Santé de la Femme (Woman’s Health Research Institute)Montigny-le-BretonneuxFrance
  4. 4.Unité Clinique d’Assistance Médicale à la Procréation, CHI de Poissy/Saint-Germain-en-LayePoissyFrance

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