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Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics

, Volume 31, Issue 4, pp 471–475 | Cite as

The safety of long-term cryopreservation on slow-frozen early cleavage human embryos

  • Qinli Liu
  • Ying Lian
  • Jin Huang
  • Xiulian Ren
  • Ming Li
  • Shengli Lin
  • Ping LiuEmail author
  • Jie Qiao
Embryo Biology

Abstract

Objective

To evaluate the impact of cryopreservation storage time on cleavage-stage embryo survival rate, pregnancy rate, implantation rate, singleton birth weight, and live birth rate.

Methods

This study was a retrospective analysis, including 867 thaw cycles and 3,367 embryos. Women who underwent IVF-FET cycles between 2005 and 2012 were analyzed. The patients were divided into four groups, as follows: group 1 (12–23 months); group 2 (24–35 months); group 3 (36–48 months); and group 4 (≥48 months).

Results

The storage time did not have a significant effect on survival, damage rate of the blastomeres, implantation rate, pregnancy rate, singleton birth weight, and live birth rate for embryos frozen at cleavage stages.

Conclusion

Storage time did not influence the survival and pregnancy outcomes of slow-frozen early cleavage human embryos. The developmental potential of cryopreserved human embryos with different storage times does not appear to have a negative influence on further development.

Keywords

Embryo cryopreservation Cleavage stage Survival Singleton birth weight Live birth rate 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank Lixue Chen who is the senior statistician in our department for analyzing some data.

The authors would like to thank Natural Sciences Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 30900512 and 810705340/H0426) for supporting this work.

Conflict of interest

None declared.

Author’s Roles

Conceived and designed the study: P.L., J.Q.; Collected data and wrote the paper: L.Q.L., Y.L.; Assisted to collected data: M.L., S.L.L.; Assisted to write the paper: J.H., X.L.R.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Qinli Liu
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Ying Lian
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Jin Huang
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Xiulian Ren
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Ming Li
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Shengli Lin
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Ping Liu
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  • Jie Qiao
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Reproductive Medical Centre, Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyPeking University Third HospitalBeijingChina
  2. 2.Key Laboratory of Assisted ReproductionMinistry of EducationBeijingChina
  3. 3.Beijing Key Laboratory of Reproductive Endocrinology and Assisted ReproductionBeijingChina

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