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Single thawed euploid embryo transfer improves IVF pregnancy, miscarriage, and multiple gestation outcomes and has similar implantation rates as egg donation

  • Assisted Reproduction Technologies
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Abstract

Purpose

The objective of our study was to determine if trophectoderm biopsy, vitrification, array-comparative genomic hybridization and single thawed euploid embryo transfer (STEET) can reduce multiple gestations and yield high pregnancy and low miscarriage rates.

Methods

We performed a retrospective observational study comparing single thawed euploid embryo to routine age matched in vitro fertilization (IVF) patients that underwent blastocyst transfer from 2008 to 2011 and to our best prognosis group donor oocyte recipients (Donor). Our main outcome measures were implantation rate, clinical pregnancy rate, spontaneous abortion rate and multiple gestation rate.

Results

The STEET group had a significantly higher implantation rate (58 %, 53/91) than the routine IVF group (39 %, 237/613) while the Donor group (57 %, 387/684) had a similar implantation rate. The clinical pregnancy rates were not statistically different between the STEET and IVF groups. However, the multiple gestation rate was significantly lower in the STEET group (STEET 2 % versus IVF 34 %, Donor 47 %).

Conclusions

STEET results in a high pregnancy rate, low multiple gestation rate and miscarriage rates. Despite the older age of STEET patients and transfer of twice as many embryos, the implantation rate for STEET was indistinguishable from that for egg donation. STEET offers an improvement to IVF, lowering risks without compromising pregnancy rate.

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Correspondence to Brooke Hodes-Wertz.

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Single thawed euploid embryo transfer results in a high pregnancy rate, low multiple gestation rate and miscarriage rates.

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Grifo, J.A., Hodes-Wertz, B., Lee, HL. et al. Single thawed euploid embryo transfer improves IVF pregnancy, miscarriage, and multiple gestation outcomes and has similar implantation rates as egg donation. J Assist Reprod Genet 30, 259–264 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10815-012-9929-1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10815-012-9929-1

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