Journal of Archaeological Research

, Volume 20, Issue 1, pp 53–115 | Cite as

The Archaeology of Tula, Hidalgo, Mexico

Article

Abstract

The site of Tula, Hidalgo, Mexico, is well known for its distinctive architecture and sculpture that came to light in excavations initiated some 70 years ago. Less well known is the extensive corpus of archaeological research conducted over the past several decades, revealing a city that at its height covered an area of c. 16 km2 and incorporated a remarkably diverse landscape of hills, plains, alluvial valleys, and marsh. Its dense, urban character is evident in excavations at over 22 localities that uncovered complex arrangements of residential compounds whose nondurable architecture left relatively few surface traces. Evidence of craft production includes lithic and ceramic production loci in specific sectors of the ancient city. Tula possessed a large and densely settled hinterland that apparently encompassed the surrounding region, including most of the Basin of Mexico, and its area of direct influence appears to have extended to the north as far as San Luís Potosí. Tula is believed to have originated as the center of a regional state that consolidated various Coyotlatelco polities and probably remnants of a previous Teotihuacan-controlled settlement system. Its pre-Aztec history exhibits notable continuity in settlement, ceramics, and monumental art and architecture. The nature of the subsequent Aztec occupation supports ethnohistorical and other archaeological evidence that Tula’s ruins were what the Aztecs called Tollan.

Keywords

Tula Tollan Toltec Cities Urbanism Archaeology Mesoamerica 

References cited

  1. Abascal Macías, R. (1982). Proyecto arqueológico Tula, Archivo Técnico de la Coordinación Nacional de Arqueología, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  2. Acosta, J. R. (1940). Exploraciones en Tula, Hidalgo, 1940. Revista Mexicana de Estudios Antropológicos 4: 172–194.Google Scholar
  3. Acosta, J. R. (1941). Los últimos descubrimientos arqueológicos en Tula, Hidalgo, 1941. Revista Mexicana de Estudios Antropológicos 5: 239–243.Google Scholar
  4. Acosta, J. R. (1942). La ciudad de Quetzalcoatl. Cuadernos Americanos 1: 121–131.Google Scholar
  5. Acosta, J. R. (1943). Los colosos de Tula. Cuadernos Americanos 2: 133–146.Google Scholar
  6. Acosta, J. R. (1944). La tercera temporada de exploraciones arqueológicas en Tula, Hgo. Revista Mexicana de Estudios Antropológicos 6: 125–164.Google Scholar
  7. Acosta, J. R. (1945). La cuarta y quinta temporada de exploraciones arqueológicas en Tula, Hgo. Revista Mexicana de Estudios Antropológicos 7: 23–64.Google Scholar
  8. Acosta, J. R. (1956a). Resumen de los informes de las exploraciones arqueológicas en Tula, Hidalgo durante las Vl, Vll y Vlll temporadas 1946–1950. Anales del Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia 8: 37–115.Google Scholar
  9. Acosta, J. R. (1956b). El enigma de los Chac Mooles de Tula. In Estudios antropológicos publicados en homenaje al Dr. Manuel Gamio, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City, pp. 159–170.Google Scholar
  10. Acosta, J. R. (1956–1957). Interpretación de algunos de los datos obtenidos en Tula relativos a la época tolteca. Revista Mexicana de Estudios Antropológicos 14: 75–110.Google Scholar
  11. Acosta, J. R. (1957). Resumen de los informes de las exploraciones arqueológicas en Tula, Hidalgo, durante las lX y X temporadas, 1953–54. Anales del Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia 9: 119–169.Google Scholar
  12. Acosta, J. R. (1959). Técnicas de reconstrucción. Esplendor de México Antiguo 11: 501–518.Google Scholar
  13. Acosta, J. R. (1960). Las exploraciones en Tula, Hidalgo durante la Xl temporada, 1955. Anales del Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia 11: 39–72.Google Scholar
  14. Acosta, J. R. (1961a). La doceva temporada de exploraciones en Tula, Hidalgo. Anales del Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia 13: 29–58.Google Scholar
  15. Acosta, J. R. (1961b). La indumentaria de los cariátides de Tula. In Homenaje a Pablo Martínez del Río, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 221–228.Google Scholar
  16. Acosta, J. R. (1964). La décimotercera temporada de exploraciones en Tula, Hgo. Anales del Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia 16: 4576.Google Scholar
  17. Acosta, J. R. (1974). La Pirámide del Corral de Tula, Hgo. In Matos, E. (ed.), Proyecto Tula, 1a. parte. Colección Científica No. 15, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 27–56.Google Scholar
  18. Angulo V., J., and Hirth, K. G.(1981). Presencia teotihuacana en Morelos. In Rattray, E., Litvak King, L., and Díaz Orizbal, C. (eds.), Interacción cultural en México central, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City, pp. 81–97.Google Scholar
  19. Anthony, D. W. (1990). Migration in archaeology: The baby and the bathwater. American Anthropologist 92: 894–914.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Aoyama, K. (2007). Elite artists and craft production in Classic Maya society: Lithic evidence from Aguateca, Guatemala. Latin American Antiquity 18: 3–26.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Armillas, P. (1950). Teotihuacan, Tula y los toltecas. RUNA 3: 37–70.Google Scholar
  22. Armillas, P. (1969). The arid frontier of Mexican civilization. Transactions of the New York Academy of Sciences, Series II, 31: 697–704.Google Scholar
  23. Aveni, A. F., Hartung, H., and Kelley, J. C. (1982). Alta Vista (Chalchihuites), astronomical implications of a Mesoamerican ceremonial outpost at the Tropic of Cancer. American Antiquity 47: 316–335.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Barba, L. A., and Córdova Frunz, J. L. (1999). Estudios energéticos de la producción de cal en tiempos teotihuacanos y sus implicaciones. Latin American Antiquity 10:168–179.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Barba, L., Blancas, J., Manzanilla, L. R., Ortiz, A, Barca, D., Crisci, G. M., and Miriello, D. (2009). Provenance of the limestone used in Teotihuacan, Mexico: a methodological approach, Archaeometry 51: 525–545.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Beekman, C. S., and Christensen, A. F. (2003). Controlling for doubt and uncertainty through multiple lines of evidence: A new look at the Mesoamerican Nahua migrations. Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory 10: 111–164.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Benz, B. F. (1999). Morphological studies of maize from Tula, Tepetitlan and Tula Chico. In Cobean, R., and Mastache, A. G. (eds.), Tepetitlan: A Rural Household in the Toltec Heartland, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, pp. 157–169.Google Scholar
  28. Bey III, G. J. (1986). A Regional Analysis of Toltec Ceramics, Tula, Hidalgo, Mexico, Ph.D. dissertation, Department of Anthropology, Tulane University, New Orleans.Google Scholar
  29. Bey III, G. J. (2007). Blanco Levantado: A New World amphora. In Pool, C. A., and Bey III, G. J. (eds.), Pottery Economics in Mesoamerica, University of Arizona Press, Tucson, pp. 114–146.Google Scholar
  30. Bey III, G. J., and Ringle, W. M. (2007). From the bottom up: The timing and nature of the Tula-Chichén Itzá exchange. In Kowalski, J., and Kristan-Graham, C. (eds.), Twin Tollans: Chichén Itzá, Tula, and the Epiclassic to Early Postclassic Mesoamerican World, Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, DC, pp. 377–427.Google Scholar
  31. Blanton, R. E. (1976). Anthropological studies of cities. Annual Review of Anthropology 5: 249–264.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Blanton, R. E., and Parsons, J. R. (1971). Ceramic markers used for period designations. In Parsons, J. R. (ed.), Prehistoric Settlement Patterns in the Texcoco Region, Mexico, Memoirs, Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, pp. 255–313.Google Scholar
  33. Blanton, R. E., Feinman, G. M., Kowalewski, S. A., and Peregrine, P. N. (1996). A dual-processual theory for the evolution of Mesoamerican civilization. Current Anthropology 37: 1–14.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Bonfil Olivera, A. (2005). Cultura y contexto: el comportamiento de un sitio del Epiclásico en la región de Tula. In Manzanilla, L. (ed.), Reacómodos demográficos del Clásico al Posclásico en el centro de México, Instituto de Investigaciones Antropológicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City, pp. 227–259.Google Scholar
  35. Brambila Paz, R. (2001). La zona septentrional en el Posclásico. In Manzanilla, L., and López Luján, L. (eds.), Historia antigua de México, Volumen III, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 319–345.Google Scholar
  36. Brambila Paz, R., and Crespo, A. M. (2005). Desplazamientos de poblaciones y creación de territorios en el Bajío. In Manzanilla, L. (ed.), Reacómodos demográficos del Clásico al Posclásico en el centro de México, Instituto de Investigaciones Antropológicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City, pp. 155–173.Google Scholar
  37. Braniff, B. (1961). Exploraciones arqueológicas en el Tunal Grande. Boletín del Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia 5: 6–8.Google Scholar
  38. Braniff, B. (1972). Secuencias arqueológicas en Guanajuato y la cuenca de México. In Teotihuacán: Onceava Mesa Redonda, Sociedad Mexicana de Antropología, Mexico City, pp. 273–324.Google Scholar
  39. Braniff, B. (1992). La estratigrafía arqueológica de Villa de Reyes, San Luís Potosí, Instituto Nacional e Antropología e Historia, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  40. Castillo Tejero, N. (1970). Tecnología de una vasija en travertino. Boletín del Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia 41: 48–52.Google Scholar
  41. Caso, A., Bernal, I., and Acosta, J. (1967). La cerámica de Monte Albán, Memorias 13, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  42. Cervantes Rosado, J., and Fournier, P. (1994). Regionalización y consumo: una aproximación a los complejos cerámicos Epiclásicos del Valle del Mezquital. Boletín de Antropología Americana 29: 105–130.Google Scholar
  43. Cervantes Rosado, J., and Torres, A. (1991). Consideraciones sobre el desarrollo Coyotlatelco en el centro-norte del altiplano central. Cuicuilco 27: 25–34.Google Scholar
  44. Cervantes Rosado, J., Fournier, P., and Carballal, M. (2009). La cerámica del Posclásico en la cuenca de México. In Merino Carrion, B. L., and Garcia Cook, A. (eds.), La produccion alfarera en el México Antiguo, Vol. V, Colección Científica 508, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  45. Charnay, D. (1887). The Ancient Cities of the New World, Chapman and Hall, London.Google Scholar
  46. Cobean, R. H. (1974). Archaeological survey of the Tula region. In Diehl, R. (ed.), Studies of Ancient Tollan, University of Missouri Monographs in Anthropology, No. 1, Columbia, pp. 6––10.Google Scholar
  47. Cobean, R. H. (1978). The Pre-Aztec Ceramics of Tula, Hidalgo, Mexico, Ph.D. dissertation, Department of Anthropology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA.Google Scholar
  48. Cobean, R. H. (1982). Investigaciones recientes en Tula Chico, Hidalgo. In Estudios sobre la antigua ciudad de Tula, Colección Científica No. 121, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 37–122.Google Scholar
  49. Cobean, R. H. (1990). La cerámica de Tula, Hidalgo, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, México City.Google Scholar
  50. Cobean, R. H., and Mastache, A. G. (1989). The Late Classic and Early Postclassic chronology of the Tula region. In Healan, D. M. (ed.), Tula of the Toltecs, University of Iowa Press, Iowa City, pp. 34–46.Google Scholar
  51. Cobean, R. H., and Mastache, A. G. (eds.) (1999). Tepetitlan: un espacio doméstico rural en el área de Tula, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh.Google Scholar
  52. Cobean, R. H., and Mastache, A. G. (2003). Turquoise and shell offerings in the Palacio Quemada of Tula, Hidalgo, Mexico. In Jansen, D. K., and de Bock, E. K. (eds.), Latin American Collections: Essays in Honour of Ted J.J. Leyenaar, Tetl, Leiden, pp. 51–65.Google Scholar
  53. Cobean, R. H., and Suárez, M. E. (1989). Informe de las excavaciones en Tula Chico, Temporada 1989, Archivo de la Coordinación Nacional de Arqueología, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  54. Cobean, R. H., Mastache, A. G., Crespo, A. M., and Díaz, C. L. (1981). La cronología de la región de Tula. In Rattray, E., Litvak King, L., and Díaz Orizbal, C. (eds.), Interacción cultural en México central, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City, pp. 187–214.Google Scholar
  55. Cook, S. F. (1949). The Historical Demography and Ecology of the Teotlalpan, Ibero–Americana 33, Berkeley.Google Scholar
  56. Cook de Leonard, C., Leonard de Orellana, J., and Soto Soria, A. (1956). La pirámide de El Tesoro de Tepeji del Río, Estado de Hidalgo. Revista Mexicana de Estudios Antropológicos 14: 117–120.Google Scholar
  57. Covarrubias, M. (1957). Indian Art of Mexico and Central America, Knopf, New York.Google Scholar
  58. Cowgill, G. L. (1996). Discussion. Ancient Mesoamerica 7: 325–331.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  59. Crane, H. R., and Griffin, J. B. (1964). University of Michigan radiocarbon dates IX. Radiocarbon 6: 1–24.Google Scholar
  60. Crespo, A. M. (1991). El recinto ceremonial de El Cerrito. In Crespo, A. M., and Brambila, R. (eds.), Querétaro prehispánico, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 163–223.Google Scholar
  61. Crespo, A. M., and Mastache, A. G. (1973). Reconocimiento de superficie en el área de Tula, Hgo. In Balance y perspectiva de la antropología, Sociedad Mexicana de Antropología, Jalapa, pp. 365–371.Google Scholar
  62. Crespo Oviedo, A. M. (1976). Villa de Reyes, San Luís Potosí, Coleccion Científica 42, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  63. Crespo Oviedo, A. M., and Mastache, A. G. (1981). La presencia en el área de Tula, Hgo. de grupos relacionados con el Barrio de Oaxaca en Teotihuacán. In Rattray, E., Litvak King, L., and Díaz Orizbal, C. (eds.), Interacción cultural en México central, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City, pp. 99–106.Google Scholar
  64. Crider, D. (n.d.). Shifting alliances: Epiclassic and Early Postclassic interactions at Cerro Portezuelo, Manuscript on file, Department of Anthropology, Arizona State University, Tempe.Google Scholar
  65. Cruz y Cruz, T. (2007). Construendo Tollán: estudio de las cimentaciones del Edificio 3, el Edificio B y las plataformas anexas al Edificio B del recinto monumental de Tula, Hidalgo, Tesis profesional, Escuela Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  66. Davies, N. (1977). The Toltecs Until the Fall of Tula, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman.Google Scholar
  67. De la Fuente, B., Trejo, S., and Gutiérrez Solana, N. (1988). Escultura en piedra de Tula, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  68. Díaz, C. (1980). Chingú: un sitio clásico del área de Tula, Hidalgo, Colección Científica No. 90, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  69. Díaz, C. (1981). Chingú y la expansión teotihuacana. In Rattray, E., Litvak King, L., and Díaz Orizbal, C. (eds.), Interacción cultural en México central, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City, pp. 107–112.Google Scholar
  70. Diehl, R. A. (ed.) (1974) Studies of Ancient Tollan: A Report of the University of Missouri Tula Archaeological Project, Monographs in Archaeology No. 1, University of Missouri, Columbia.Google Scholar
  71. Diehl, R. A. (1981). Tula. In Bricker, V. R., and Sabloff, J. (eds.), Supplement to the Handbook of Middle American Indians, Vol. 1, University of Texas Press, Austin, pp. 277–295.Google Scholar
  72. Diehl, R. A. (1983). Tula: The Toltec Capital of Ancient Mexico, Thames and Hudson, London.Google Scholar
  73. Diehl, R. A. (1989a). Previous investigations at Tula. In Healan, D. (ed.), Tula of the Toltecs: Excavations and Survey, University of Iowa Press, Iowa City, pp. 13–29.Google Scholar
  74. Diehl, R. A. (1989b). A shadow of its former self: Teotihuacan during the Coyotlatelco period. In Diehl, R. A., and Berlo, J. C. (eds.), Mesoamerica After the Decline of Teotihuacan A. D. 700900, Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, DC, pp. 9–18.Google Scholar
  75. Diehl, R. A. (1993). The Toltec horizon in Mesoamerica. In Rice, D. (ed.), Latin American Horizons, Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, DC, pp. 263–294.Google Scholar
  76. Diehl, R. A., and Berlo, J. C. (eds.) (1989). Mesoamerica After the Decline of Teotihuacan A.D. 700900, Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  77. Diehl, R. A., and Stroh, E. G. (1978). Tecali vessel manufacturing debris at Tollan, Hidalgo. American Antiquity 43: 73–79.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  78. Diehl, R. A., Lomas, R., and Wynn, J. (1974). Toltec trade with Central America: New light and evidence. Archaeology 22(2): 182–187.Google Scholar
  79. Dumond, D. E., and Muller, F. (1972). Classic to Postclassic in highland central Mexico. Science 175: 1208–1215.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  80. Durán, D. (1984). Historia de las indias de Nueva España e islas de Tierra Firme, Editorial Porría, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  81. Elson, C. M., and Mowbray, K. (2005). Burial practices at Teotihuacan in the Early Postclassic period. Ancient Mesoamerica 16: 195–211.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  82. Equihua Manrique, J. C. (2003). La alfarería de Tula, Tesis profesional, Escuela Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  83. Equihua Manrique, J. C. (2006). El Coyotlatelco y las primeras manifestaciones culturales en Tula Grande. In Solar Valverde, L. (ed.), El fenómeno Coyotlatelco en el centro de México: tiempo, espacio y significado, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, México City, pp. 281–289.Google Scholar
  84. Estrada Vazquéz, M. (2004). La cerámica prehispánica de la región de Tula, del preclásico al posclásico tardío, Tesis profesional, Escuela Nacional de Antropologia e Historia, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  85. Evans, S. T. (1988). Excavations at Cihuatecpan, an Aztec Village in the Teotihucan Valley, Publications in Anthropology No. 36, Department of Anthropology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN.Google Scholar
  86. Evans, S. T. (2001). Aztec noble courts. In Inomata, T., and Houston, S. (eds.), Royal Courts of the Ancient Maya, Westview Press, Boulder, CO, pp. 237–273.Google Scholar
  87. Evans, S. T., and Freter, A. (1996). Teotihuacan Valley, Mexico, Postclassic chronology: Hydration analysis of obsidian from Cihuatecpan, an Aztec period village. Ancient Mesoamerica 7: 267–280.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  88. Excelsior. (2009). Hallan adoratorio a Xipe-Totec en Tula. Excelsior, December 1.Google Scholar
  89. Feinman, G. M. (2001). Mesoamerican political complexity: The corporate-network dimension. In Haas, J. (ed.), From Leaders to Rulers, Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, New York, pp. 151–176.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  90. Feinman, G., and Nicholas, L. (2000). High-intensity household-scale production. In Feinman, G., and Manzanilla, L. (eds.), Cultural Evolution, Contemporary Viewpoints, Kluwer Academic, New York, pp. 119–140.Google Scholar
  91. Fernández Dávila, E. (1986). Nivel de producción y especialización artesanal en un taller de producción de artefactos líticos en Tula, Hidalgo, Tesis profesional, Escuela Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  92. Fernández Dávila, E. (1994). La producción de artefactos líticos en Tula, Hidalgo. In Fernández Dávila, E. (ed.), Simposium sobre arqueología en el estado de Hidalgo: trabajos recientes, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 47–68.Google Scholar
  93. Flannery, K. V., and Marcus, J. (1994). Early Formative Pottery of the Valley of Oaxaca, Memoirs No. 27, Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.Google Scholar
  94. Flores Morales, L. M., and Crespo Oviedo, A. M. (1988). Elementos cerámicos de asentamientos toltecas en Guanajuato y Querétaro. In Serra Puche, M. C., and Navarrete Cáceres, C. (eds.), Ensayos de alfarería prehispánica e histórica de Mesoamérica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City, pp. 205–220.Google Scholar
  95. Folan, W. J. (1981). San Miguel de Huamango: un centro regional del antiguo estado de Tula-Jilotepec. In Piña Chan, R. (ed.), Investigaciones sobre Huamango y región vecina, Vol. I, Gobierno del Estado de México, Toluca, pp. 205–349.Google Scholar
  96. Fournier García, P. (2006). Lo Coyotlatlco: la construcción de narrativas arqueológicas acerca del epiclásico. In Solar Valverde, L. (ed.), El fenómeno Coyotlatelco en el centro de México: tiempo, espacio y significado, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 431–441.Google Scholar
  97. Fournier García, P. (2007). Los Hñähñu del valle del Mezquital: maguey, pulque y alfarería, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  98. Fournier, P., and Bolaños, V. H. (2007). The Epiclassic in the Tula region beyond Tula Chico. In Kowalski, J., and Kristan-Graham, C. (eds), Twin Tollans: Chichén Itzá, Tula, and the Epiclassic to Early Postclassic Mesoamerican World, Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, DC, pp. 481–529.Google Scholar
  99. Fournier García, P., Cervantes Rosado, J., and Blackman, M. J. (2006). Mito y realidad del estilo epiclásico Coyotlatelco. In Solar Valverde, L. (ed.), El fenómeno Coyotlatelco en el centro de México: tiempo, espacio y significado, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 55–82.Google Scholar
  100. Fowler, W. R. (2011). El complejo Guazapa en El Salvador, la diáspora tolteca y las migraciones pipiles. La Universidad 14: 1–20.Google Scholar
  101. Fox, R. H. (1977). Urban Anthropology, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ.Google Scholar
  102. García Chávez, R. (2004). De Tula a Atzcapotzalco: caracterización de los altepetl de la cuenca de México, Tesis doctoral, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  103. García Chávez, R., Gamboa, L., Váldez Saldaña, N., and Moragas Segura, N. (2006). Clasificación y análisis para que? La cerámica de fase Coyotlatelco de la cuenca de México. In Solar Valverde, L. (ed.), El fenómeno Coyotlatelco en el centro de México: tiempo, espacio y significado, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 97–126.Google Scholar
  104. García Cook, A. (1981). The historical importance of Tlaxcala in the cultural development of the central highlands. In Bricker, V. R., and Sabloff, J. A. (eds.), Supplement to the Handbook of Middle American Indians, Vol. 1, University of Texas Press, Austin, pp. 244–276.Google Scholar
  105. García Cubas, A. (1873). Ruinas de la antigua Tollan. Boletín de la Sociedad de Geografía y Estadística de la República Mexicana 1: 173–187.Google Scholar
  106. Gaxiola González, M. (2006). Tradición y estilo en el estudio de la variabilidad cerámica del Epiclásico en el centro de México. In Solar Valverde, L. (ed.), El fenómeno Coyotlatelco en el centro de México: tiempo, espacio y significado, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 31–54.Google Scholar
  107. Getino Granados, F. (2000). El edificio K de Tula, Hidalgo, Tesis profesional, Escuela Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  108. Getino Granados, F. (n.d.). Excavaciones arqueólogicas en la zona urbana norte de la antigua ciudad de Tula, Manuscript on file, Department of Anthropology, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA.Google Scholar
  109. Gillespie, S. D. (2007). Toltecs, Tula, and Tollan: Changing perspectives on a recurring problem in Mesoamerican archaeology and art history. In Kowalski, J., and Kristan-Graham, C. (eds.), Twin Tollans: Chichén Itzá, Tula, and the Epiclassic to Early Postclassic Mesoamerican World, Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, DC, pp. 85–127.Google Scholar
  110. Gómez Chávez, S., and Cabrera Castro, R. (2006). Contextos de la ocupación Coyotlatelca en Teotihuacán. In Solar Valverde, L. (ed.), El fenómeno Coyotlatelco en el centro de México: tiempo, espacio y significado, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 231–256.Google Scholar
  111. Gómez Serafín, S. (1994). Costumbres funerarias prehispánicas en Tula, Hidalgo. In Fernández Dávila, E (ed.), Simposio sobre arqueología en el estado de Hidalgo: trabajos recientes, Colección Científica, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 81–91.Google Scholar
  112. Gómez Serafín, S., Sansores, F. J., and Fernández Dávila, E. (1994). Enterramientos humanos de la época prehispánica en Tula, Hidalgo, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  113. González Quintero, L. (1968). Tipos de vegetación del valle del Mezquital, Paleoecología No. 2, Departamento de Salvamento, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  114. González Quintero, L. (1999). The identification of floral remains and the social implications. In Cobean, R., and Mastache, A. G. (eds.), Tepetitlan: A Rural Household in the Toltec Heartland, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, pp. 139–147.Google Scholar
  115. González Quintero, L., and Montufar López, A. (1980). Interpretación paleoecológica del contenido polínico de un núcleo cercano a Tula, Hgo. In Sánchez, F. (ed.), III coloquio sobre paleobotánica y palinología memorias, Collección Científica No. 86, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 27–40.Google Scholar
  116. Gorenflo, L. J., and Sanders, W. T. (2007). Archaeological Settlement Pattern Data from the Cuautitlan, Temascalapa, and Teotihuacan Regions, Mexico, Occasional Papers in Anthropology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park.Google Scholar
  117. Hassig, R. (1998). Aztec Warfare: Imperial Expansion and Political Control, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman.Google Scholar
  118. Healan, D .M. (1986). Technological and nontechnological aspects of an obsidian workshop excavated at Tula, Hidalgo. Research in Economic Anthropology 2: 133–152.Google Scholar
  119. Healan, D. M. (ed.) (1989). Tula of the Toltecs: Excavations and Survey, University of Iowa Press, Iowa City.Google Scholar
  120. Healan, D. M. (1992a). Local versus non-local obsidian exchange at Tula and its implications for post-Formative Mesoamerica. World Archaeology 24: 449–466.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  121. Healan, D. M. (1992b). A comment on Moholy-Nagy’s “The misidentification of lithic workshops.” Latin American Antiquity 3: 240–242.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  122. Healan, D. M. (1993). Urbanism at Tula from the perspective of residential archaeology. In Santley, R. S., and Hirth, K. G. (eds.), Prehispanic Domestic Units in Western Mesoamerica, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, pp. 105–120.Google Scholar
  123. Healan, D. M. (1997). Prehispanic quarrying in the Ucareo–Zinapécuaro obsidian source area. Ancient Mesoamerica 8: 77–100.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  124. Healan, D. M. (1998). La cerámica coyotlatelca y la explotación de la obsidiana de Ucareo–Zinapécuaro. In Darras, V. (ed.), Genesis, culturas, y espacios en Michoacán, Centro de Estudios Mesoamericanos, Mexico City, pp. 101–112.Google Scholar
  125. Healan, D. M. (2001). Acosta’s Tula Grande: Fact or falsification? Paper presented at the 66th Annual Meeting, Society for American Archaeology, New Orleans, LA.Google Scholar
  126. Healan, D. M. (2002). Prismatic core/blade technology in Epiclassic/Early Postclassic Tula and Ucareo. In Andrews, B., and Hirth, K. (eds.), Pathways to Prismatic Blades: Sources of Variation in Mesoamerican Lithic Technology, Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, University of California, Los Angeles, pp. 27–36.Google Scholar
  127. Healan, D. M. (2003). From the quarry pit to the trash pit: Comparative core/blade technology at Tula, Hidalgo and Ucareo, Michoacan. In Hirth, K. (ed.), Mesoamerican Lithic Technology: Experimentation and Interpretation, University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City, pp. 153–169.Google Scholar
  128. Healan, D. M. (2007). New perspectives on Tula’s obsidian industry and its relationship to Chichén Itzá. In Kowalski, J., and Kristan-Graham, C. (eds.), Twin Tollans: Chichén Itzá, Tula, and the Epiclassic to Early Postclassic Mesoamerican World, Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, DC, pp. 429–447.Google Scholar
  129. Healan, D. M. (2009a). Household, neighborhood, and urban structure in an “adobe city”: Tula, Hidalgo, Mexico. In Manzanilla, L. R., and Chapdelaine, C. (eds.), Domestic Life in Prehispanic Capitals: A Study of Specialization, Hierarchy, and Ethnicity, Memoirs No. 46, Museum of Anthropology, University of Michican, Ann Arbor, pp. 67–88.Google Scholar
  130. Healan, D. M. (2009b). Ground platform preparation and the “banalization” of the prismatic blade in western Mesoamerica. Ancient Mesoamerica 20: 103–111.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  131. Healan, D. M. (n.d.). A reevaluation of evidence for urban planning at Tula, Manuscript on file, Department of Anthropology, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA.Google Scholar
  132. Healan, D. M., and Stoutamire, J. W. (1989). Surface survey of the Tula urban zone. In Healan, D. M. (ed.), Tula of the Toltecs: Excavations and Survey, University of Iowa Press, Iowa City, pp. 203–236.Google Scholar
  133. Healan, D. M., Kerley, J., and Bey III, G. (1983). Excavation and preliminary analysis of an obsidian workshop in Tula, Hgo., Mexico. Journal of Field Archaeology 10: 127–145.Google Scholar
  134. Healan, D. M., Cobean, R. H., and Diehl, R. A. (1989). Synthesis and conclusions. In Healan, D. M. (ed.), Tula of the Toltecs: Excavations and Survey, University of Iowa Press, Iowa City, pp. 239–251.Google Scholar
  135. Hernandez, C. (2000). A history of Prehispanic Ceramics, Interaction, and Frontier Development in the UcareoZinapécuaro Obsidan Source Area, Michoacan, Mexico, Ph.D. dissertation, Department of Anthropology, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA.Google Scholar
  136. Hernandez, C., and Healan, D. M. (2000). The Toltec world as seen from northeast Michoacan. Paper presented at the 65th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Philadelphia.Google Scholar
  137. Hernandez, C., and Healan, D. M. (n.d.). Chronometric dating and the ceramic chronology of the Ucareo–Zinapécuaro, Michoacan obsidian source area, Manuscript on file, Department of Anthropology, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA.Google Scholar
  138. Hernández Reyes, C. (1994). Rescate de una tumba zapoteca en Tepeji del Río. In Fernández, E. (ed.), Simposium sobre arqueología en el estado de Hidalgo: trabajos recientes, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 125–142.Google Scholar
  139. Hernández Reyes, C., Cobean, R. H., Mastache, A. G., and Suárez, M. E. (1999). Un taller de alfareros en la antigua ciudad de Tula. Arqueología 22: 69–88.Google Scholar
  140. Hers, M. A. (1989). Los toltecas en tierras chichimecas, Cuadernos de Historia del Arte, 35, Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  141. Hirth, K. G. (1978). Interregional trade and the formation of prehistoric gateway communities. American Antiquity 43: 35–45.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  142. Hirth, K. G. (2003). The altepetl and urban structure in prehispanic Mesoamerica. In Sanders, W., Mastache, A. G., and Cobean, R. H. (eds.), Urbanism in Mesoamerica, Vol. 1, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, pp. 58–85.Google Scholar
  143. Hirth, K. G. (ed.) (2006). Obsidian Craft Production in Ancient Central Mexico, University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City.Google Scholar
  144. Hirth, K. G. (ed.) (2009). Housework: Craft Production and Domestic Economy in Ancient Mesoamerica, Archeological Papers, Vol. 19, American Anthropological Association, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  145. Hirth, K. G., and Angulo, J. (1981). Early state expansion in central Mexico: Teotihuacan in Morelos. Journal of Field Archaeology 8: 135–150.Google Scholar
  146. Inomata, T. (2001). The power and ideology of artistic creation: Elite craft specialists in Classic Maya society. Current Anthropology 42: 321–349.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  147. Jiménez Betts, P. (2006). La problemática de Coyotlatelco vista desde el noroccidente de Mesoamérica. In Solar Valverde, L. (ed.), El fenómeno Coyotlatelco en el centro de México: tiempo, espacio y significado, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 35–92.Google Scholar
  148. Jiménez García, E. (1998). Iconografía de Tula: el caso de la escultura, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  149. Jiménez Moreno, W. (1959). Síntesis de la historia pretolteca de Mesoamérica. Esplendor del México Antiguo 2: 1019–1108.Google Scholar
  150. Jiménez Moreno, W. (1966). Mesoamerica before the Toltecs. In Paddock, J. (ed.), Ancient Oaxaca: Discoveries in Mexican Archaeology and History, Stanford University Press, Stanford, CA, pp. 1–82.Google Scholar
  151. Kaplan, L. (1999). Analysis of archaeological phaseolus from Tepetitlan and Tula. In Cobean, R., and Mastache, A. G. (eds.), Tepetitlan: A Rural Household in the Toltec Heartland, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, pp. 148–155.Google Scholar
  152. Kelley, E. A. (1978). The Temple of the Skulls at Altavista, Chlachihuites. In Riley, C. L., and Hendrick, B. C. (eds.), Across the Chichimec Sea, Southern Illinois University Press, Carbondale, pp. 102–126.Google Scholar
  153. Kirchhoff, P. (1985). El imperio tolteca y su caída. In Brambila, R., and Pérez-Rocha, E. (eds.), Mesoamérica y el centro de Mexico, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 249–272.Google Scholar
  154. Klein, C. F. (1987). The ideology of autosacrifice at the Templo Mayor. In Boone, E. H. (ed.), The Aztec Templo Mayor, Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, DC, pp. 293–370.Google Scholar
  155. Kowalski, K., and Kristan-Graham, C. (eds.) (2007). Twin Tollans: Chichén Itzá, Tula, and the Epiclassic to Early Postclassic Mesoamerican World, Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  156. Kristan-Graham, C. (1989). Art, Rulership, and the Mesoamerican Body Politic at Tula and Chichén Itzá, Ph.D. dissertation, Department of Art History, University of California, Los Angeles.Google Scholar
  157. Kristan-Graham, C. (1993). The business of narrative at Tula. Latin American Antiquity 4: 3–21.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  158. Kristan-Graham, C. (2007). Structuring identity at Tula: the design and symbolism of colonnaded halls and sunken spaces. In Kowalski, J., and Kristan-Graham, C. (eds), Twin Tollans Chichén Itzá, Tula, and the Epiclassic to Early Postclassic Mesoamerican World, Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, DC, pp. 531–578.Google Scholar
  159. Kubler, G. (1961). Chichén Itzá y Tula. Estudios de la Cultura Maya 1: 47–80.Google Scholar
  160. Linne, S. (1934). Archaeological Research at Teotihuacan, Mexico, Ethnographic Museum of Sweden, Stockholm.Google Scholar
  161. López Aguilar, F. (1994). Historia prehispánica del valle del Mezquital. In Fernández Dávila, E. (ed.), Simposium sobre arqueología en el estado de Hidalgo: trabajos recientes, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 113–123.Google Scholar
  162. López Aguilar, F., Solar Valverde, L., and Vilanova de Allende, R. (1998). El valle del Mezquital, encrucijadas en la historia de los asentamientos humanos en un espacio discontinuo. Arqueología 20: 21–40.Google Scholar
  163. López Luján, L., and López Austin, A. (2009). The Mexica in Tula and Tula in Mexico-Tenochtitlan. In Fash, W. L., and López Luján, L. (eds.), The Art of Urbanism: How Mesoamerican Kingdoms Represented Themselves in Architecture and Imagery, Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, DC, pp. 384–422.Google Scholar
  164. López Perez, C., Nicolás Careta, C., and Manzanilla N., L. (2006). Atributos morfológicos y estilísticos de la cerámica Coyotlatelco en el centro ceremonial de Teotihuacan. In Solar Valverde, L. (ed.), El fenómeno Coyotlatelco en el centro de México: tiempo, espacio y significado, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 216–230.Google Scholar
  165. Manzanilla, L. (2003). The abandonment of Teotihuacan. In Inomata, T., and Webb, R. (eds.), The Archaeology of Settlement Abandonment in Middle America, University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City, pp. 91–101.Google Scholar
  166. Manzanilla, L. (ed.) (2005). Reacómodos demográficos del Clásico al Posclásico en el centro de México, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  167. Manzanilla, L. (2006). Estados corporativos arcaicos: organizaciones de excepción en escenarios excluyentes. Cuicuilco 13: 13–45.Google Scholar
  168. Manzanilla, L., López, C., and Freter, A. (1996). Dating results from excavations in quarry tunnels behind the Pyramid of the Sun at Teotihuacan. Ancient Mesoamerica 7: 245–266.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  169. Marcus, J. (1983). On the nature of the Mesoamerican city. In Vogt, E. Z., and Leventhal, R. M. (eds.), Prehistoric Settlement Patterns, University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque, pp. 195–242.Google Scholar
  170. Martínez Magaña, R. (1994). Un rescate en el Cerro del Elefante, Tunititlán, Hidalgo. In Fernández Dávila, E. (ed.), Simposium sobre arqueología en el estado de Hidalgo: trabajos recientes, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 143–149.Google Scholar
  171. Mastache, A. G. (1996a). El estado tolteca, una investigación sobre su proceso de desarrollo y estructura social, económica y política, Ph.D. dissertation, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  172. Mastache, A. G. (1996b). El amaranto y el maguey en el dieta Tolteca. In Mastache, A. G., Parsons, J. R., Santley, R. S., and Sera Puche, M. C. (eds.), Aqueología mesoamericana: homenaje a William T. Sanders, Vol. 1, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 355–373.Google Scholar
  173. Mastache, A. G., and Cobean, R. H. (1989). The Coyotlatelco culture and the origins of the Toltec state. In Diehl, R. A., and Berlo, J. (eds.), Mesoamerica after the Decline of Teotihuacan, Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, DC, pp. 49–68.Google Scholar
  174. Mastache, A. G., and Cobean, R. H. (1990). La cultura Coyotlatelco en el área de Tula. In Mastache, A. G., Cobean, R. H., Rees, C., and Jackson, D. (eds.), Las industrias Coyotlatelco en el área de Tula, Colección Científica No. 221, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 9–22.Google Scholar
  175. Mastache, A. G., and Crespo, A. M. (1974). La ocupación prehispánica de Tula, Hgo. In Matos Moctezuma, E. (ed.), Proyecto Tula, 1a. Parte, Colección Científica No. 15, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 71–103.Google Scholar
  176. Mastache, A. G., and Crespo, A. M. (1982). Análisis sobre la traza general de Tula, Hgo. In Estudios sobre la antigua ciudad de Tula, Colección Científica No. 121, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 11–38.Google Scholar
  177. Mastache, A. G., Cobean, R. H., and Healan, D. M. (2002). Ancient Tollan: Tula and the Toltec Heartland, University Press of Colorado, Boulder.Google Scholar
  178. Mastache, A. G., Healan, D. M., and Cobean, R. H. (2009). Four hundred years of settlement and cultural continuity in Epiclassic and Early Postclassic Tula. In Fash, W. L., and López Luján, L. (eds.), The Art of Urbanism: How Mesoamerican Kingdoms Represented Themselves in Architecture and Imagery, Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, DC, pp. 290–329.Google Scholar
  179. Matos Moctezuma, E. (1972). El tzompantli en Mesoamérica. In Religión en Mesoamérica, XII Mesa Redonda, Sociedad Mexicana de Antropología, Cholula, Puebla, pp. 109–116.Google Scholar
  180. Matos Moctezuma, E. (1974a). Excavaciones en la microárea: Tula Chico y la Plaza Charnay. In Matos Moctezuma, E. (ed.), Proyecto Tula, 1a. parte, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 61–69.Google Scholar
  181. Matos Moctezuma, E. (ed.) (1974b). Proyecto Tula, 1a. parte, Colección Científica No. 15, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  182. Matos Moctezuma, E. (ed.) (1976). Proyecto Tula, 2a. parte, Colección Científica No. 33, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  183. McBride, H. W. (1969). The extent of the Chupícuaro tradition. In Frierman, J. D. (ed.), The Natalie Wood Collection of Pre-Columbian Ceramics from Chupícuaro, Guanajuato, Mexico, University of California, Los Angeles, pp. 33–49.Google Scholar
  184. McBride, H. W. (1974). Formative Ceramics and Prehistoric Settlement Patterns in the Cuauhtitlan Region, Mexico, Ph.D. dissertation, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Los Angeles.Google Scholar
  185. McCafferty, G. G. (2001). Ceramics of Postclassic Cholula, Mexico, Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, University of California, Los Angeles.Google Scholar
  186. Metcalfe, S., and Davies, S. (2007). Deciphering recent climate change in central Mexican lake records. Climatic Change 83: 169–186.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  187. Millon, R. (1973). Urbanization at Teotihuacan, Mexico, Volume 1: The Teotihuacan Map, University of Texas Press, Austin.Google Scholar
  188. Millon, R. (1996). The last years of Teotihuacan. In Yoffee, N., and Cowgill, G. (eds.), The Collapse of Ancient States and Civilizations, Unversity of Arizona Press, Tucson, pp. 102–164.Google Scholar
  189. Molina Montes, A. (1982). Archaeological buildings: Restoration or misinterpretation? In Boone, E. (ed.), Falsifications and Misconstructions of Pre-Columbian Art, Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, DC, pp. 125–141.Google Scholar
  190. Molina Montes, A. (1987). Templo Mayor architecture: So what’s new? In Boone, E. H. (ed.), The Aztec Templo Mayor, Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, DC, pp. 97–107.Google Scholar
  191. Moncayo Ochoa, R. E. (1999). Ceramic analysis. In Cobean, R. H., and Mastache, A. G. (eds.), Tepetitlan: A Rural Household in the Toltec Heartland, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, pp. 75–110.Google Scholar
  192. Mountjoy, J. B., and Brockington, D. L. (1987). Introducción. In Mountjoy, J. B., and Brockington, D. L. (eds.), El auge y la caída del Clásico en el México central, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 7–20.Google Scholar
  193. Muller, F. (1970). La cerámica de Cholula. In Marquina, I. (ed.), Proyecto Cholula, Serie Investigaciones 19, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 129–142.Google Scholar
  194. Nalda, E. (1975). UA San Juan del Río: trabajos arqueológicos preliminaries, Tesis profesional, Escuela Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  195. Nalda, E. (1991). Secuencia cerámica del sur de Querétaro. In Crespo, A. M., and Brambila, R. (eds.), Querétaro prehispánico, Colección Científica No. 238, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 31–57.Google Scholar
  196. Nelson, B. A. (1997). Chronology and stratigraphy at La Quemada, Zacatecas, Mexico. Journal of Field Archaeology 24: 85–109.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  197. Nelson, B. A., and Crider, D. (2005). Posibles pasajes migratorios en el norte de México y el suroeste de los Estados Unidos. In Manzanilla, L. (ed.), Reacómodos demográficos del Clásico al Posclásico en el centro de México, Instituto de Investigaciones Antropológicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City, pp. 75–102.Google Scholar
  198. Nichols, D. L., and Charlton, T. L. (1996). The Postclassic occupation at Otumba: A chronological assessment. Ancient Mesoamerica 7: 231–244.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  199. Nichols, D. L., and Charlton, T. L. (1997). The Archaeology of City-States, Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  200. Nichols, D. L., and McCullough, J. (1986). Excavations at Xometla. In Sanders, W. T. (ed.), The Teotihuacan Valley Project Final Report, Vol. 4, Occasional Papers in Anthropology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, pp. 53–94.Google Scholar
  201. Paredes Gudiño, B. L. (1990). Unidades habitacionales en Tula, Hidalgo, Colección Científica No. 210, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  202. Paredes Gudiño, B. L. (2005). Análisis de flujos migratorios y composición multiétnica de la población de Tula, Hgo. In Manzanilla, L. (ed.), Reacómodos demográficos del Clásico al Posclásico en el centro de México, Instituto de Investigaciones Antropológicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City, pp. 203–225.Google Scholar
  203. Parsons, J. R. (2008). Prehispanic Settlement Patterns in the Northwestern Valley of Mexico: The Zumpango Region, Memoirs No. 45, Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.Google Scholar
  204. Parsons, J. R. (2010). The pastoral niche in prehispanic Mesoamerica. In Staller, J., and Carrasco, M. (eds.), Pre-Columbian Foodways: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Food, Culture, and Markets in Mesoamerica, Springer, New York, pp. 109–137.Google Scholar
  205. Parsons, J. R., and Darling, J. A. (2000). Maguey (Agave spp.) utilization in Mesoamerican civilization: A case for precolumbian “pastoralism.” Boletín de la Sociedad Botánica de México 66: 81–91.Google Scholar
  206. Parsons, J. R., and Gorenflo, L. (in press). Why is Aztec II Black/Orange so scarce in the Zumpango region? In Cobean, R. (ed.), Homenaje a Guadalupe Mastache, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, México City.Google Scholar
  207. Parsons, J. R., and Parsons, M. H. (1990). Maguey Utilization in Highland Central Mexico, Anthropological Papers No. 92, Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.Google Scholar
  208. Parsons, J. R., Brumfiel, E., Parsons, M., and Wilson, D. (eds.) (1982). Prehispanic Settlement Patterns in the Southern Valley of Mexico: The Chalco-Xochimilco Region, Memoirs No. 14, Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.Google Scholar
  209. Parsons, J. R., Brumfiel, E., and Hodge, M. (1996). Developmental implications of earlier dates for early Aztec in the Basin of Mexico. Ancient Mesoamerica 7: 217–230.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  210. Pastrana Cruz, A. (1977). Producción de instrumentos en obsidiana, división del trabajo, M.A. thesis, Escuela Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  211. Peña, A., and Rodríguez, M. C. (1976). Excavaciones en Daini, Tula, Hgo, Informe Preliminar. In Matos Moctezuma, E. (ed.), Proyecto Tula, 2a. parte, Colección Científica No. 33, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 85–90.Google Scholar
  212. Polaco, O. (1999). Analysis of the faunal remains. In Cobean, R., and Mastache, A. G. (eds.), Tepetitlan: A Rural Household in the Toltec Heartland, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, pp. 125–138.Google Scholar
  213. Polgar Salcedo, M. (1998). La perifería en la continuidad y el colapso. Arqueología 20: 41–52.Google Scholar
  214. Rattray, E. C. (1966). An archaeological and stylistic study of Coyotlatelco pottery. Mesoamerican Notes 78: 87–211.Google Scholar
  215. Rattray, E. C. (1996). Regional perspective on the Epiclassic period in central Mexico. In Mastache, A. G., Parsons, J. R., Santley, R. S., and Serra Puche, M. C. (eds.), Arqueología Mexicana: Homenaje a William T. Sanders, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 213–231.Google Scholar
  216. Rattray, E. C. (2001). Teotihuacan Ceramics: Chronology and Cultural Trends, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh.Google Scholar
  217. Rattray, E. C. (2006). El epiclásico de Teotihuacán y Atzcapotzalco. In Solar Valverde, L. (ed.), El fenómeno Coyotlatelco en el centro de México: tiempo, espacio y significado, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 201–214.Google Scholar
  218. Rees, C. (1990). Estudio sobre la cantera–taller del sitio Magoni. In Mastache, A. G., Cobean, R. H., Rees, C., and Jackson, E. (eds.), Las industrias líticas Coyotlatelco en el área de Tula, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 23–143.Google Scholar
  219. Ringle, W. M., Gallareta Negrón, T., and Bey III, G. J. (1998). The return of Quetzalcoatl: Evidence for the spread of a world religion during the Epiclassic period. Ancient Mesoamerica 9: 183–232.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  220. Sahagún, B. de (1961). Florentine Codex, General History of the Things of New Spain, Book 10, School of American Research, Santa Fe, NM.Google Scholar
  221. Saint-Charles Zetina, J. C., and Enríquez Farías, R. (2006). Cerámica del Epiclásico en el sur de Querétaro. In Solar Valverde, L. (ed.), El fenómeno Coyotlatelco en el centro de México: tiempo, espacio y significado, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 309–326.Google Scholar
  222. Sánchez, M. G. (1999a). Analysis of chipped stone. In Cobean, R., and Mastache, A. G. (eds.), Tepetitlan: A Rural Household in the Toltec Heartland, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, pp. 171–238.Google Scholar
  223. Sánchez, M. G. (1999b). Descriptive analysis of basalt and rhyolite scrapers and high-backed scrapers. In Cobean, R., and Mastache, A. G. (eds.), Tepetitlan: A Rural Household in the Toltec Heartland, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, pp. 399–424.Google Scholar
  224. Sanders, W. T. (1986). The Toltec period occupation of the valley. In The Teotihucan Valley Project Final Report, Vol. 4, Occasional Papers in Anthropology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, pp. 117–189.Google Scholar
  225. Sanders, W. T. (2006). Late Xolalpan–Metepec/Oxtotipac–Coyotlatelco: Ethnic succession or changing patterns of political economy? In Solar Valverde, L. (ed.), El fenómeno Coyotlatelco en el centro de México: tiempo, espacio y significado, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 183–200.Google Scholar
  226. Sanders, W. T., and Price, B. J. (1967). Mesoamerica: The Evolution of a Civilization, Random House, New York.Google Scholar
  227. Sanders, W. T., and Santley, R. S. (1983). A tale of three cities: Energetics and urbanization in pre-Hispanic central Mexico. In Vogt, E. Z., and Leventhal, R. M. (eds.), Prehistoric Settlement Patterns, University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque, pp. 243–292.Google Scholar
  228. Sanders, W. T., and Webster, D. (1988). The Mesoamerican urban tradition. American Anthropologist 90: 521–546.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  229. Sanders, W. T., Parsons, J. R., and Santley, R. S. (1979). The Basin of Mexico, Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  230. Sejourne, L. (1956). Informe sobre el material exhumado en Ahuizotla, Azcapotzalco. Revista Mexicana de Estudios Antropológicos 15: 33–35.Google Scholar
  231. Sjoberg, G. (1960). The Preindustrial City, The Free Press, Glencoe, IL.Google Scholar
  232. Smith, Jr., C. E. (1967). Plant remains. In Byers, D. S. (ed.), The Prehistory of the Tehuacan Valley, Vol. 1, University of Texas Press, Austin, pp. 220–260.Google Scholar
  233. Smith, M. E. (1989). Cities, towns, and urbanism: Comment on Sanders and Webster. American Anthropologist 91: 454–461.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  234. Smith, M. E. (1992). Archaeological Research at Aztec-Period Rural Sites in Morelos, Mexico, Vol. 1, Monographs in Latin American Archaeology No. 4, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh.Google Scholar
  235. Smith, M. E. (1997). Life in the provinces of the Aztec empire. Scientific American 277: 56–63.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  236. Smith, M. E. (2007). Tula and Chichén Itzá: Are we asking the right questions? In Kowalski, J., and Kristan-Graham, C. (eds.), Twin Tollans: Chichén Itzá, Tula, and the Epiclassic to Early Postclassic Mesoamerican World, Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, DC, pp. 579–617.Google Scholar
  237. Smith, M. E., and Montiel, L. (2001). The archaeological study of empires and imperialism in pre-Hispanic central Mexico. Journal of Anthropological Archaeology 20: 245–284.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  238. Solar Valverde, L. (ed.) (2006). El fenómeno Coyotlatelco en el centro de México: tiempo, espacio y significado, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  239. Spence, M. W. (1992). Tlailotlacan, a Zapotec Enclave in Teotihuacan. In Berlo, J. C. (ed.), Art, Ideology, and the City of Teotihuacan, Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, DC, pp. 59–88.Google Scholar
  240. Spence, M. W. (2005). A Zapotec diaspora network in Classic-Period central Mexico. In Stein, G. (ed.), The Archaeology of Colonial Encounters, School of American Research Press, Santa Fe, NM, pp. 173–206.Google Scholar
  241. Stahle, D. W., Villanueva Díaz, J., Burnette, D. J., Cerano Paredes, J., Heim Jr., R. R., Fye, F. K., Acuna Soto, R., Therrell, M. K., Cleaveland, M. K., and Stahle, D. K. (2011). Major Mesoamerican droughts of the past millennium. Geophysical Research Letters 38: 1–4.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  242. Sterpone Canuto, O. (2000). El palacio Quemado de Tula: una evaluación estratigráphica, Dimensión Antropológica 18: 7–27.Google Scholar
  243. Sterpone Canuto, O. (2000–2001). La quimera de Tula. Boletín de Antropología Americana 37: 141–204.Google Scholar
  244. Sterpone Canuto, O. (2006a). Coyotlatelco y los orígenes de Tula Grande. In Solar Valverde, L. (ed.), El fenómeno Coyotlatelco en el centro de México: tiempo, espacio y significado, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 257–279.Google Scholar
  245. Sterpone Canuto, O. (2006b). Tula–Mazapa entre Coyotlatelco y Tollan. Cuicuilco 13: 71–96.Google Scholar
  246. Stocker, T. L., and Spence, M. W. (1973). Trilobal eccentrics at Teotihuacan and Tula. American Antiquity 38: 195–199.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  247. Stoutamire, J. W. (1975). Trend Surface Analysis of Survey Data from Tula, Hidalgo, Mexico, Ph.D. dissertation, Department of Anthropology, University of Missouri, Columbia.Google Scholar
  248. Stuart, D. (2000). The arrival of strangers: Teotihuacan and Tollan in Classic Maya history. In Carrasco, D., Jones, L., and Sessions, S. (eds.), Mesoamerica’s Classic Heritage from Teotihuacan to the Aztecs, University of Colorado Press, Boulder, pp. 465–513.Google Scholar
  249. Stuiver, M., and Reimer, P. J. (1993). Extended (super 14) C data base and revised CALIB 3.0 (super 14) C age calibration program. Radiocarbon 35: 215–230.Google Scholar
  250. Suárez Cortes, M. E., Healan, D. M., and Cobean, R. H. (2007). Los orígenes de la dinastía real de Tula. Arqueología Mexicana 85: 48–50.Google Scholar
  251. Sugiura Yamamoto, Y. (1993). El ocaso de las ciudades y los movimientos poblaciones en al altiplano central. In Serra Puche, M. C. (ed.), El poblamiento de México: una visión históricodemográphica, Vol. 1, Consejo Nacional de Población, Mexico City, pp. 190–215.Google Scholar
  252. Sugiura Yamamoto, Y. (2006). Cambio gradual o discontinuidad en la cerámica? discussión acerca del paso del Clásico al Epiclásico, visto desde el Valle de Toluca. In Solar Valverde, L. (ed.), El fenómeno Coyotlatelco en el centro de México: tiempo, espacio y significado, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 127–162.Google Scholar
  253. Torres Rodríguez, A., Cervantes, J., and Fournier, P. (1999). Las relaciones entre el centro y la periferia, el caso de las comunidades del Clásico en la región de Tula, México. Boletín de Antropología Americana 35: 73–93.Google Scholar
  254. Tovalín Ahumada, A. (1998). Desarrollo arquitectónico del sitio arqueológico de Tlalpizahuac, Colección Científica 348, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  255. Tozzer, A. M. (1921). Excavations of a Site at Santiago Ahuitzotla City, Mexico, Bulletin 74, Bureau of American Ethnology, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  256. Vaillant, G. C. (1938). A correlation of archaeological and historical sequences in the Valley of Mexico. American Anthropologist 40: 535–573.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  257. Vaillant, G. C. (1941). Aztecs of Mexico, Doubleday, New York.Google Scholar
  258. Weaver, M. P. (1981). The Aztecs, Maya, and Their Predecessors, Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  259. Webb, M. C. (1978). The significance of the “epiclassic” period in Mesoamerican prehistory. In Browman, D. L. (ed.), Cultural Continuity in Mesoamerica, Mouton, The Hague, pp. 155–178.Google Scholar
  260. Wheatley, P. (1972). The concept of urbanism. In Ucko, P., Tringham, R., and Dimbleby, G. (eds.), Man, Settlement, and Urbanism, Gerald Duckworth, London, pp. 601–637.Google Scholar
  261. Wolfman, D. (1990). Mesoamerican chronology and archaeomagnetic dating, A.C. 1–1200. In Eighmy, J. L., and Sternberg, R. S. (eds.), Archaeomagnetic Dating, University of Texas Press, Austin, pp. 261–391.Google Scholar
  262. Wolf, E. (1976). The Valley of Mexico, University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque.Google Scholar
  263. Yadeun, J. (1974). Análisis espacial de la zona arqueológica de Tula, Hgo. In Matos Moctezuma, E. (ed.), Proyecto Tula, 1a. parte, Colección Científica No. 15, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 53–59.Google Scholar
  264. Yadeun Angulo, J. (1975). El estado y la ciudad: el caso de Tula, Hgo, Colección Científica No. 25, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City.Google Scholar

Bibliography of recent literature

  1. Báez Urincho, F. (2008). El Edifico 4, un palacio en Tula Grande, el aposento del rey tolteca. Online article published at http://www.famsi.org/reports/07026es/index.html.
  2. Beekman, C. S., and Christensen, A. F. (2011). Power, agency, and identity: Migration and aftermath in the Mezquital area of north-central Mexico. In Cabana, G., and Clark, J. (eds.), Current Developments in the Anthropological Study of Past Human Migration, University Press of Florida, Gainesville, pp. 147–171.Google Scholar
  3. Braniff, B. (1999). Morales, Guanajuato y la tradición tolteca, Colección Científica, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  4. Cobean, R. H. (2007). La alfarería tolteca. In Merino Carrión, B. L., and García Cook, A. (eds.), La producción alfarera en el México antiguo IV, Colección Científica, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City, pp. 57–76.Google Scholar
  5. Cobean, R. H., and Mastache, A. G. (1995). Tula. In López Luján, L., Cobean, R. H., and Mastache, A. G. (eds.), Xochicalco y Tula, Jaca Book, Milan.Google Scholar
  6. Cobean, R., and Mastache, A. G. (1999). Jorge R. Acosta. In Murray, T. (ed.), Encyclopedia of Archaeology: The Great Archaeologists, Garland Press, New York, pp. 425–434.Google Scholar
  7. Cobean, R., and Mastache, A. G. (2001). Toltec. In Carrasco, D. (ed.), The Oxford Encyclopedia of Mesoamerican Cultures, Vol. 3, Oxford University Press, New York, pp. 239–241.Google Scholar
  8. Crespo, A. M., and Viramontes, C. (eds.) (1996). Tiempo y territorio en arqueología: el centro norte de México, Serie Arqueología, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  9. Domínguez, S., and Pastrana, A. (2009). Cambios a la estrategia de la explotación de la obsidiana de Pachuca: Teotihuacan, Tula, y la Triple Alianza. Ancient Mesoamerica 20: 129–148.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Evans, S. T., and Webster, D. L. (eds.) (2001). Archaeology of Ancient Mexico and Central America: An Encyclopedia, Garland, New York.Google Scholar
  11. Fournier, P., and Vargas Sanders, R. (2002). En busca de los “dueños de silencio”: cosmovisión y ADN antiguo de la poblaciones otomiés epiclásicas de la región de Tula. In Estudios de cultura Otopame, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City, pp. 37–76.Google Scholar
  12. Gamboa Cabezas, L. (2007). El palacio quemado, Tula: seis décadas de investigaciones. Arqueología Mexicana 85: 42–47.Google Scholar
  13. Getino Granados, F., and Cid Bezíez, J. R. (2000). Astros y montañas, elementos rectores para el trazo urbano en Teotihuacan y Tula. Arqueología 24: 87–106.Google Scholar
  14. Healan, D. M., and Cobean, R. H. (2009). La interacción cultural entre el centro y el occidente de México vista desde la región de Tula. In Williams, E., López Mestas, L., and Esparza, R. (eds.), Las sociedades complejas del occidente de México en el mundo mesoamericano, El Colegio de Michoacán, Morelia, pp. 327–348.Google Scholar
  15. Hodge, M. G., and Minc, L. D. (1990). The spatial patterning of Aztec ceramics: Implications for prehispanic exchange systems in the Valley of Mexico. Journal of Field Archaeology 17: 415–437.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Jiménez García, E. (2008). Catálogo escultorio-iconográfico de Tula, Hidalgo: sus imagines en piedra. Online article published at http://www.famsi.org/reports/07027es/index.html.
  17. Jones, L. (1995) Twin City Tales: A Hermeneutical Reassessment of Tula and Chichén Itzá, University Press of Colorado, Boulder.Google Scholar
  18. Kristan-Graham, C. (1999). Architecture of the Tula body politic. In Kowalski, J. K. (ed.), Mesoamerican Architecture as Cultural Symbol, Oxford University Press, New York, pp. 162–175.Google Scholar
  19. Marcus, J., and Sabloff, J. (eds.) (2008). The Ancient City, School for Advanced Research Press, Santa Fe, NM.Google Scholar
  20. Mastache, A. G., and Cobean, R. H. (2000). Ancient Tollan: The sacred precinct. RES: Anthropology and Aesthetics 38: 100–133.Google Scholar
  21. Mastache, A. G., and Cobean, R. H. (2003). Urbanism at Tula. In Sanders, W. T., Mastache, A. G., and Cobean, R. H. (eds.), Urbanism in Mesoamerica, Vol. 1, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, pp. 217–256.Google Scholar
  22. Mastache, A. G., Cobean, R. H., García Cook, A., and Hirth, K. G. (eds.) (2008). Urbanism in Mesoamerica, Vol. 2, Pennsylvania State University, University Park.Google Scholar
  23. Paredes Gudiño, B. L. (1998). Evidencias de ocupación del período Coyotlatelco en la zona arqueológica de Tula. In Antropología e historia del occidente de México, XXIV Mesa Redonda, Sociedad Mexicana de Antropología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City, pp. 1629–1644.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyTulane UniversityNew OrleansUSA

Personalised recommendations